Commando Raid in Norway – Part II

Lead: In the early 1940s it became clear that it was possible to construct a nuclear bomb. While proceeding with their own atomic research, the allies set-out to destroy German efforts to build the bomb.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Essential to the construction of a nuclear device was a sustained and controlled atomic reaction. To obtain that the Germans relied on the use of heavy water to moderate the progress of the reaction. Heavy water, a substance extracted from ordinary water at great cost was made in sufficient quantities in only one place, the Norsk Hydrogen Electrolysis plant at Vemork, Norway. Soon after Germany occupied Norway in 1940, the allied command began making plans to take out that that plant. At first high altitude bombing was rejected since it would was sure to cause numerous casualties among Norwegian civilians.

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Commando Raid in Norway – III

                Lead:  To stop the Germans from developing an atomic bomb, the allied command in World War II determined to destroy the Norwegian plant that produced heavy water, a substance essential to nuclear research.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Norsk Hydro factory near the town of Vemork was located high on one side of a valley surrounded by minefields and treacherous cliffs. Aerial bombing was considered too dangerous. Local Norwegians still worked there for the Germans who occupied the country in 1940.

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Commando Raid in Norway – Part I

Lead: One of the great fears of the Allied leadership during World War II was that Germany might build the first atomic bomb.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Germans were among the pioneers in nuclear research. A team under Otto Hahn at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry in Dahlem, a suburb of Berlin, in December, 1938, succeeded in splitting the uranium atom. After his results had been confirmed, it took only a short leap of imagination for scientists to realize the potential for creating a weapon of terrible power. German scientists. British scientists. American scientists.

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Hitler’s Family Secret

Lead:  For Adolf Hitler, the key to understanding history was not economic or morality, it was biology. A person's race determined how they fit into the Nazi scheme of things. That's why Hitler was petrified that someone would find out his family secret.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the war a file was discovered in the Nazi Archives, a file maintained by no less important person than Reichsfuehrer Heinrich Himmler, Hitler's second in command. The file contained the results of three major Gestapo investigations during the 1930s and 40s into Adolf Hitler's family and background. Considering the great emphasis the Nazi's placed on racial superiority and hereditary traits, the secrets the files reveal would have been very embarrassing to the Party and the Fuehrer himself.

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Architect of Victory – Admiral Earnest King

Lead:  During World War II, the organizer of the U.S. Navy's contribution to victory was a determined, often grumpy and taciturn Scot, born November 23, 1878, Fleet Admiral Ernest Joseph King.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Raised by his father, a hard working railroad foreman of Scottish heritage, King secured an appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy and was commissioned in 1903.

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Raoul Wallenberg: Angel of Life – Part IV

Lead:  Having played the central role in saving 100,000 Jews of Budapest, Raoul Wallenberg was arrested by the Russians.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the winter of 1945 the Russian Army arrived at the gates of the Hungarian capital. Wallenberg had developed a plan that would help bring a restoration of services and a quicker return to normalcy. He wished to discuss this with the Russian commander and the Provisional Hungarian Government located in a provincial town 130 miles from the capital city. Under Russian escort he left the City on January 17th. His associates never saw him again.

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Raoul Wallenberg: Angel of Life – III

Lead: Using unorthodox methods, Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat posted to Budapest in late 1944, helped save over 100,000 Hungarian Jews from deportation and certain death.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Backed by his government and cash, Wallenberg took advantage of his position and wartime conditions to spare extract many thousands from the flood being taken to the death camps. He used three important techniques.

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Raoul Wallenberg: Angel of Life – II

Lead: Near the end of World War II, using unorthodox methods, the Swedish diplomat, Raoul Wallenberg helped save thousands of Hungarian Jews from death in the concentration camps.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: By the early months of 1944, Nazi atrocities against the Jews could no longer be ignored. With mounting horror allied and neutral governments began to take tentative steps help those threatened by the Nazi Final Solution.

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