Armed Forces Radio II

Lead: During World War II the British Broadcasting Corporation and the American Forces Radio (AFN) had to be forced to work together in support of the Normandy invasion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Required to give up its monopoly on radio broadcasting in Britain during World War II, the BBC welcomed the fledgling GI network with surprising grace considering its previous opposition. BBC helped AFN with studios, engineering assistance and expertise, but it was not easy. The Brits strove for scrupulous accuracy in their broadcasts and were offended at the informal American broadcast style and occasional willingness to use questionable sources and interpretation in news reporting. They considered AFN to have accomplished a great deal, but that it was really little more than a small town operation, with announcers that were illiterate, unresourceful, and couldn't even read scripts very well.

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Armed Forces Radio I

Lead: During World War II, to the lonely GI, Armed Forces Radio was a welcome reminder of home. It is a part of the war that continues to this day.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1942 Allied forces began to assemble for the Normandy invasion in bases throughout the English countryside. For many, this was the first time away from home and they missed it. To pass the time they listened to the radio, and for that the only choice was the British Broadcasting Company. This was the heyday of the BBC. All over Europe, indeed, all over the world, those who could listen were dependent on the BBC for news that was largely free from bias, very accurate, and absent the hopeless propaganda that poured out of Berlin, Rome and Tokyo. To the American ear, however, the BBC was deadly dull. The music was boring, the humor dry and out of context, the announcers starchy and pretentious.

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Gallipoli – Part III

Lead: During World War I at Gallipoli, forces of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, Anzac, endured a bitter and disheartening trail by fire. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.               

Content: In early 1915 an attempt by French and British naval units to force the strategic Dardanelles Strait in European Turkey failed. Forming the western shore of the strait is the peninsula Gallipoli extending 50-miles southwest into the Aegean Sea. This ill-fated naval expedition telegraphed the allies intent and in the month after the withdrawal of the ships the Turks reinforced their positions, hauled in heavy artillery and increased their defensive troops by a factor of six.

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Gallipoli – Part II

Lead: During World War I, the largest military amphibious landing up to that time, took place on the Gallipoli. At the heart of the attack were troops from Anzac.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content:  In early 1915, the Allies cast their strategic eyes on the Dardenelles,  the vital waterway running between European and eastern Turkey. The Allies wanted take the strait and Constantinople, the Turkish capital, so as to control navigation between the Mediterranean and Black Seas, to open a sea route to Russia which was being pressed by Turkish forces advancing in the Caucasus region and perhaps to divert German forces which were beating up the French and British on the western front and Russia in the east.

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Gallipoli Part I

Lead: During World War I, using primarily Australian and New Zealand troops, the allies attempted to open a southern front at Gallipoli.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: Gallipoli is a narrow, hilly peninsula in European Turkey, extending 50 miles southwest into the Aegean Sea. Along the eastern bank of the peninsula is the Dardanelles, one of the world most strategic waterways, governing access to the Mediterranean and Black Seas and vital to both sides in the war.

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Japanese American Concentration Camps – II

Lead: During World War II the United States, incarcerated over 100,000 Japanese American citizens. Fear and political calculation combined to produce a constitutional and personal travesty.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: The detention centers were Spartan and at first barely livable, but gradually conditions improved for these American citizens, men, women and children, who had been shipped from their homes on the Pacific coast to the ten inland concentration camps. In retrospect the entire evacuation was unnecessary, born of political calculation and fear. In the wake of Japan’s sudden attack on December 7th, there was an explosion of patriotic sentiment and anger against all things Japanese. Newspapers fed the feelings of hurt and betrayal with often inaccurate stories about possible Japanese American complicity in the assault. The U.S. military had been unprepared by the attack and was fearful of an invasion. The Western Defense Command demanded the removal of ethnic Japanese, despite their citizenship. Yet, there was no credible evidence that Japanese Americans had or would have helped in any invasion.

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