The Doolittle Raid I

Lead: A demoralized and defeated America awoke to the news in the Spring of 1942 that US planes had dropped bombs on Tokyo.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: For the five months after Pearl Harbor in December, 1941 Americans were treated to an almost continuous stream of bad news. Everywhere across the Pacific US forces were reeling under the hammer blows of the victorious Japanese war machine. Wake Island, Borneo, Guam, the Philippines (constituted) one disaster after another; then a break (came) in the gloom. Word came that bombers of the Army Air Forces had raided Tokyo and other Japanese cities. Shell-shocked Americans were jubilant.

 

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Voyage of Death I (USS Indianapolis)

Lead: At 8:00 AM on July 16, 1945 the USS Indianapolis, carrying components of the atomic bomb that would be dropped on Hiroshima, glided through the Golden Gate. Destination: Tinian.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Captain Charles B. McVay, III was a graduate of the Naval Academy, the son of an Admiral. On short notice, he received orders to carry the nuclear cargo while directing the final stages of repair to damage inflicted on the Indianapolis in a nearly fatal kamikaze attack off Okinawa Island earlier that year. The ship was ready but the crew was filled with a large number of inexperienced new men. McVay wanted more time to train but the Navy needed a bomb delivered and his fast cruiser was available.

 

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Battle of the Coral Sea II

Lead: In the May 1942 Battle of the Coral Sea, allied naval forces halted the Japanese southern advance on New Guinea and Australia, but not without severe losses, including that of the Lady Lex.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the great disappointments to the Japanese after Pearl Harbor was that the surprise attack failed to catch the aircraft carriers, Enterprise, Lexington and Saratoga, which were at sea. This failure would return to bite them badly in the Coral Sea six months later, yet in the heady days following the initial success in late 1941 Tokyo decided to expand its ambitions by moving south toward Australia. The most immediate target was Port Moseby in southeastern Papua New Guinea.

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Battle of the Coral Sea I

Lead: In what may have been the first truly modern naval engagement, Japanese and American carrier aircraft fought over the Coral Sea in May, 1942. No surface ship in either navy sighted the enemy.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In wake of the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, Japanese forces sought to take advantage of allied confusion and their own stunning success in the early days of the war in the Pacific. They upgraded their Strategic Plan to include strikes toward the central Pacific island of Midway and south toward New Guinea and Australia. Midway in June 1942 would prove to be perhaps the decisive defeat for the Japanese Navy in World War II, but the Coral Sea engagement a month earlier, even though it has been considered a draw, stopped the southern advance of the Japanese juggernaut and laid the foundation for the subsequent U.S. victory at Guadalcanal the following winter.

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Wheelchair Inspiration – National Veterans Wheelchair Games

Lead: America’s veterans have often paid a terrible lingering physical and mental price for their service. The National Veterans Wheelchair Games helps many rise above their suffering.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After World War II, many surviving servicemen came home severely handicapped. The loss of limbs and other types of physical incapacity compounded the normal struggle in readjusting to civilian pursuits. Through the G.I. Bill many went on to complete college, but the nation also provided ongoing rehabilitative services to terribly wounded veterans.

France Surrenders to Germany – 1940

Lead: It ended almost before it began. Using lightning tactics perfected in Poland the previous autumn, in May 1940 Germany forced France to surrender.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.
Content: For eight months after the collapse of Poland in September 1939, Allied and Axis forces engaged in what in the West was called the Phony War or Twilight War. The Germans named it sitskreig or sitting war.