Dietrich Bonhoeffer I

Lead: The life of German theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer demonstrated the practical, as well as the dangerous, consequences of moral leadership.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In his formative years, few would have considered Dietrich Bonhoeffer as a candidate for martyrdom. His upbringing and training, however, were of a somewhat more academic bent than most who aspired to service as German Lutheran pastors in the early twentieth century. His father was a professor of psychiatry at the University of Berlin and Bonhoeffer followed the academic path to Tübingen, Berlin, and New York’s Union Theological Seminary. Along the way, in addition to his scholarly pursuits, he served churches in Harlem, New York, Barcelona, Spain, and London. By 1931, as the political storm gathered in Germany, he was home lecturing and doing church work in Berlin.

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Two Flags Over Iwo Jima II

 

Lead: The taking of Iwo Jima was a blood bath on both sides, but the US Marines were inspired to even greater sacrifice when, on the fourth day of fighting, the Stars and Stripes appeared, as if by a miracle, over Mt. Suribachi.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It actually was two flags. At mid-morning February 23, 1945, 40 men from the 3rd Platoon, E Company, 2nd Battalon 28th Marine Regiment finished their long climb to the top of Mt. Suribachi, the extinct volcano dominating the skyline of the Pacific island of Iwo Jima. They had negotiated cliffs, tunnels, mines, booby traps and ravines all occupied by an entrenched enemy. A small US flag was attached to a steel pole and hoisted, for the first time, over Japanese home territory. Ship’s whistles sounded, Marines all over the island cheered and some shed tears in the midst of the enormous sacrifice required to take the island. Marine photographer Lou Lowery captured the event on film.

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Two Flags Over Iwo Jima I

Lead: While the invasion of Iwo Jima in February 1945 was not universally advocated, the Marines who landed there with their forfeit and blood made it an eternal shrine to courage and sacrifice.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the brilliant tactics of the US war in the Pacific in World War II was “island-hopping.” American forces would hop around an island deemed unessential to the war on Japan and heavily defended by the Japanese and move to better islands closer to the homeland from which air attacks could be launched. The Japanese defenders on islands hopped over would thus be cut off from supplies and support and left to rot until the war was over. Originally, Iwo Jima was a candidate for hopping. It had 22,000 Jap troops heavily dug in and thoroughly supplied.

 

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PT Boats – Mighty Mites of WWII – I

Lead: Sleek and fast, the PT Boat often proved itself the first line of offense to the beleaguered Allies in World War II.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The patrol torpedo boat or as it was known simply, the PT boat, was the happy fusion of streams in the evolution of speed-boating. First, in these low-lying craft were placed massive marine engines, three Packard V-12 power plants, boasting 1250 horsepower each. These could drive a fifty-two ton boat at more than forty knots hour after hour in the most extreme weather and sea conditions. Second, this propulsive force was enclosed in a hull constructed of mahogany timbers held together by a spruce and oak superstructure so resilient that the little boats could withstand occasional complete submerging and once in a while jump into full flight above the surging current.

 

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Dancing Stallions from Lipizza II

Lead: Bred as royal horses of the Austrian emperors, the beautiful and graceful Lipizzaner stallions were the subject of a spectacular rescue at the end of World War II.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Hapsburg emperors bred the Lipizzaners for their strength and intelligence. With the end of World War I, the empire was no more but the white stallions, in their home at Vienna's Spanish Riding School, continued the tradition of the precision riding originally developed as battlefield maneuvers against enemy soldiers.

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Dancing Stallions from Lipizza I

Lead: The graceful and elegant stallions of Vienna's Spanish Riding School have a long and fascinating history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is hard for those living in the late twentieth century to imagine a time in which motorized transport was nonexistent and the horse in its various breeds was the indispensable provider of locomotion and carriage for goods and people. Today, expensive to maintain and relatively rare, the horse has largely become a diversion and source of entertainment for the well-to-do. There was a time, however, when one had a horse or walked, when goods were mostly conveyed by horse power or by humans, when the fate of nations was decided by the quality of horse bred and fought in their service.

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LFM: Armed Forces Radio

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During World War II Armed Forces Radio was a welcome reminder of home to the lonely GI. It is a legacy of the war that entertains and informs service men and women to this day. In 1942 allied forces began to assemble for the Normandy invasion in bases throughout the English countryside. For many this was the first time away from home and they missed it.

 

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The Doolittle Raid II

Lead: Convinced America needed a boost to its flagging morale and hoping to inflict at least a little damage on the enemy, President Roosevelt encouraged his service chiefs to strike the Japanese Home Islands. They sent Jimmy Doolittle to Tokyo.
Intro. A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.
Content: Up to the middle of 1942, the Second World War in the Pacific was largely a one-sided affair. Nearly everywhere American forces were on the defensive, reeling from repeated defeats. Lt. Colonel Doolittle, a legendary test pilot and air ace, assembled a volunteer force and they began to practice to fly B-25 Mitchell Medium Bombers off the deck of the USS Hornet. The plan was to rendezvous with Admiral William Halsey's carrier taskforce in mid-Pacific and close to within 500 miles of Japan where they would launch the two engined bombers heavily loaded with fuel for the 2000 mile trip. 

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