Kalashnikov Semi-Automatic Rifle II

Lead: Originally designed to help the Soviet army best the Germans in World War II, the AK-47 has become the weapon of choice for insurgent forces world-wide.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: An automatic weapon, in particular the AK-47, has a relatively simple operating mechanism. When a firing pin hits the cartridge primer, the exploding gunpowder creates a wave of gas which propels the bullet out of the barrel at enormous speed. Caught between the bullet and the cartridge, the gas builds up pressure because it has no place to go. Near the muzzle there is a small opening which bleeds off some of the gas into a tube above or below the barrel. The pressure of the gas in the tube pushes the bolt backward, ejecting the spent cartridge and opening the firing chamber to receive a fresh cartridge from the magazine which is pushed upward into the chamber by a spring. As long as the trigger is depressed, the process repeats itself over and over.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [80.72 KB]

Kalashnikov Semi-Automatic Rifle I

Lead: The world’s greatest killing machine, with some 250,000 victims a year, is a Russian invention, the Ak-47, Mr. Kalashnikov’s semi-automatic assault rifle.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: At the high-point of Operation Barbarossa, Adolf Hitler’s ultimately disastrous invasion of Russia that began in 1941, units of the German Army were approaching the outskirts of Moscow. In September they arrived at Bryansk, a city buried in the forest along the Desna River southwest of Moscow. Nazi bombing nearly wiped out the town, killing more than 80,000. Nearly 200,000 were taken into slave camps.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download

The Doolittle Raid II

Lead: Convinced America needed a boost to its flagging morale and hoping to inflict at least a little damage on the enemy, President Roosevelt encouraged his service chiefs to strike the Japanese Home Islands. They sent Jimmy Doolittle to Tokyo.

Intro. A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Up to the middle of 1942, the Second World War in the Pacific was largely a one-sided affair. Nearly everywhere American forces were on the defensive, reeling from repeated defeats. Lt. Colonel Doolittle, a legendary test pilot and air ace, assembled a volunteer force and they began to practice to fly B-25 Mitchell Medium Bombers off the deck of the USS Hornet. The plan was to rendezvous with Admiral William Halsey's carrier taskforce in mid-Pacific and close to within 500 miles of Japan where they would launch the two engined bombers heavily loaded with fuel for the 2000 mile trip.

Read more →

The Doolittle Raid I

Lead: A demoralized and defeated America awoke to the news in the Spring of 1942 that US planes had dropped bombs on Tokyo.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: For the five months after Pearl Harbor in December, 1941 Americans were treated to an almost continuous stream of bad news. Everywhere across the Pacific US forces were reeling under the hammer blows of the victorious Japanese war machine. Wake Island, Borneo, Guam, the Philippines (constituted) one disaster after another; then a break (came) in the gloom. Word came that bombers of the Army Air Forces had raided Tokyo and other Japanese cities. Shell-shocked Americans were jubilant.

 

Read more →

Churchill and Chamberlain – IV

Lead: With the nation at war with Germany, Britain’s Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain summoned an old political foe to join the war cabinet.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Despite his attempts to appease Adolf Hitler, Chamberlain had also begun a quiet policy of rearmament. If the Nazis could not be accommodated, Britain might have to fight them. When war thrust itself on the reluctant Prime Minister, he turned for assistance to the man who had for most of the 1930s carried on a lonely crusade for confronting the Nazi threat, Winston Spencer Churchill.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [71.03 KB]

Churchill and Chamberlain – II

Lead: Faced with the growing power of Germany Britain’s Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain sought accommodation with the Nazis with the policy of appeasement.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In hindsight appeasement usually stimulates thoughts of cowardly surrender to German demands, but at the time it was considered by many to be a reasonable response to legitimate grievances. The policy which was wildly popular actually began under Chamberlain’s predecessor, Stanley Baldwin. Britain stood aside when Italy attacked Ethiopia in August 1935. Baldwin and Chamberlain after him remembered the horror of the First World War and were determined to avoid a repeat at all costs. They were concerned that the British Empire lacked the resources to face down Japan, Italy and Germany at the same time so they attempted to reach agreement with the strongest, the Nazi Regime of Adolf Hitler.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [69.45 KB]

Churchill and Chamberlain – I

Lead: In the late 1930s, with the world lurching toward another global conflict, the clash of two personalities helped define Britain's response to the Nazi threat.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Few men had more preparation for national leadership than Arthur Neville Chamberlain. He hailed from a family of prominent business oriented politicians. His father, Joseph Chamberlain, was a dominant figure in turn-of-the-century politics. Neville Chamberlain's blue chip resume included success in business, Lord Mayor of Birmingham, Member of Parliament for three decades, Postmaster General, Minister of Health, Chancellor of the Exchequer and then in 1937, Prime Minister. His view of the world never changed much from that of a West Country businessman. He despised communism, feared and loathed war because of the havoc it inflicted upon business and everyday life, and sincerely believed that rational people could sit down and work out their differences. Pity that he did not live in another time, for Chamberlain was ill-equipped to face his great adversary. Adolf Hitler was neither a businessman nor was he rational.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [69.15 KB]

PT Boats – Mighty Mites of WWII – I

Lead: Sleek and fast, the PT Boat often proved itself the first line of offense to the beleaguered Allies in World War II.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The patrol torpedo boat or as it was known simply, the PT boat, was the happy fusion of streams in the evolution of speed-boating. First, in these low-lying craft were placed massive marine engines, three Packard V-12 power plants, boasting 1250 horsepower each. These could drive a fifty-two ton boat at more than forty knots hour after hour in the most extreme weather and sea conditions. Second, this propulsive force was enclosed in a hull constructed of mahogany timbers held together by a spruce and oak superstructure so resilient that the little boats could withstand occasional complete submerging and once in a while jump into full flight above the surging current.

 

Read more →