Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley II

Lead: By the 1830s Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley, the wife of Boston Unitarian parson, had become one of the most influential thinkers in America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Self-taught classical scholar, Sarah Ripley, never traveled out of New England and never published any of her writings. Still, she influenced the works and thoughts of many of her contemporaries – Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, William Ellery Channing, and her close friend Ralph Waldo Emerson, her husband’s nephew, and once her pupil.

 

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Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley I

Lead: Born in 1793 in Concord, Massachusetts, Sarah Alden Bradford became one of America’s most influential intellects of 19th century.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley was the eldest child of a New England sea captain with family roots tracing back to the Plymouth Colony governor, William Bradford. She grew up in an intellectual family. Her parents collected books from all over Europe, and they arranged for a classical education for all of their children at a time when there were few opportunities for girls to study classics, much less go to college. Sarah had a precocious mind and a keen sense of observation, particularly of the natural world.

 

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Mujeres Libres II

Lead: During the Spanish Civil War, a women’s liberation movement, Mujeres Libres, free women of Spain, pushed for a far more radical social revolution for women than even their male allies on the left were willing to tolerate.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Even by contemporary standards, the condition of Spanish women in the 1930s was pitiful. Clearly oppressed, women’s wages were half that of men, daughters were handed over to husbands as property, divorce was illegal. Women could not be out at night without a chaperone. Until the War, women’s rights groups focused on minor adjustments such as legalizing divorce, but during the liberating early days of the civil conflict, women’s organizations, allied with anarchist political groups, began to press for serious social change.

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Mary Walker

Lead: Brilliant, stubborn, and independent, Mary Walker led the way in more ways than simple fashion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: “Why don’t you wear proper clothing? That toggery is neither one thing nor the other!” General William Tecumseh Sherman to Mary Walker, who was the first woman to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. In her long life Mary Charles Walker rarely bent to society’s demands. She became one of the first women physicians in the U.S., served as an army combat surgeon, and was a life-long participant in the fight for women’s rights. Women need two things, she thought, the right to vote and the right to wear any clothes they desire. She was almost always wore trousers.

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Mary Cassatt II

Lead: In 1877 in Paris, France, young American artist Mary Cassatt received an invitation from Edgar Degas, one of the most celebrated of French Impressionist.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1877, Philadelphian Mary Cassatt had settled permanently in Paris. Although her paintings had been accepted by the prestigious but conventional Paris Salon for several years, she grew contemptuous of the jury system of the Salon after one of her finest portraits was rejected because it was too bright and then accepted the following year after she deliberately darkened the background to make it look more academic.

 

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Mary Cassatt I

Lead: In 1866, twenty-two year old Philadelphia artist, Mary Cassatt, against her family’s wishes, moved to Paris. There she became the only American invited to exhibit her works with the “impressionists.”

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Cassatt was born in western Pennsylvania in 1844. She first studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts but soon recognized the limitations of study in America, particularly for women, and decided to move to Europe. In Paris, Cassatt studied independently at the Louvre and Ecole des Beaux-Arts until she was forced to leave Paris in 1870 during the Franco-Prussian War. Cassatt spent two years traveling throughout Europe studying great painters and then in her thirtieth year, returned to Paris, established a studio and settled permanently.

 

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Amelia Earhart II

Lead: Her name was famous around the world and not just for her epic flying accomplishments. She was a consummate believer that women had an equal place with men, and then over the Pacific in 1937 Amelia Earhart was lost.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Though she grew up in a more conventional Victorian era, Earhart was in spirit a child of the twentieth century. A strong promoter of women’s rights, from childhood she had participated in those arenas usually reserved for boys and then men. She believed that notions of retiring femininity were outdated and everything she did paved the way for women to follow: athletically, professionally, and personally. Her position on the faculty of Purdue University, advising on aeronautics and women’s career opportunities, allowed her to influence a new generation of women leaders.

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Amelia Earhart I

Lead: Among pioneer aviators, only Charles Lindbergh exceeded the fame and accomplishments of Amelia Earhart. She was a model and inspiration for millions, including millions of women.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Born in Victorian-era Kansas in 1897 of a prosperous family, Earhart early on demonstrated an independent spirit, an inclination toward adventure, and robust imagination. She refused to be trapped in the usual roles reserved for girls and then later women, playing a variety of sports and showing a remarkable curiosity about all things mechanical. Yet, Earhart read voraciously and had little difficulty succeeding in the affairs of the mind.

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