Indira Gandhi II

Lead: Cloudy were the political fortunes of India’s longtime Prime Minister Indira Gandhi in the late 1970s. Unfazed, she engineered a vigorous comeback.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Her political intuition, which in the past had seemed infallible, was failing. Power was slipping from her grasp. In June 1975 the High Court of Allabahad (‘a la ba had) found the Prime Minister guilty of irregular and illegal election practices. Economic decline was forcing many Indians further into poverty. When rising public disorder threatened the government, Gandhi resorted to desperation tactics. She declared an emergency, sent political enemies to prison, rescinded constitutional rights, and censored the press with unusual harshness. Confident that her actions had cowed the opposition Gandhi called a snap election. The people rejected her borderline authoritarianism and handed the Prime Minister’s Congress Party a sound thrashing.

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Indira Gandhi I

Lead: Born of a political family prominent in the movement for independence, Indira Gandhi became a leader in her own right as Prime Minister of India

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The daughter of Jawahalal Nehru, India’s first Prime Minister after independence, after education in Switzerland and Oxford, she returned home, married a lawyer, Feroze Gandhi, then served her widowed father as hostess. By 1955 she had her own seat in the Indian Parliament and four years later became President of the Congress Party, the nation’s strongest political alliance.

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First Ladies: Hannah Van Buren

Lead:  Like Jackson before him and Jefferson at the beginning of the century, in 1837 Martin Van Buren came to the White House a widower. Very little is known of Hannah Van Buren.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Born in 1783 she was the first President's wife to be born a United States citizen. They grew up together in Kinderhook, New York, attended the same school and were married in 1807. Martin read for the law and was county attorney, then they moved to Albany, the state capital where he served as state's attorney. The first year the family was in Albany was a very severe one and she developed tuberculosis, became an invalid and this mother of five sons died in 1819 at the age of thirty-six.

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Golda Meir

Lead: One of Israel's strongest leaders was a little girl from Milwaukee, Goldie Mabovich.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Born in Kiev, Ukraine, Goldie emigrated with her family to Milwaukee in 1906. She attended the Teacher's Seminary but was soon attracted to politics and became a leader in Milwaukee's Labor Zionist Party. In 1921 with her husband Morris Myerson, she went to live in Palestine. For a time they tried the communal life of a kibbutz but finally abandoned it. Their two children were born in the early 1920's in Jerusalem while the couple scratched for a living, he as a carpenter, she as a washerwoman. The siren call of politics brought Goldie into the General Federation of Labor and during the 1930's, she rose in prominence and political position.

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Susan B Anthony II

Lead:  Devoted to a succession of causes, Susan Brownell Anthony did not hesitate to challenge laws she felt were discriminatory.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: At the end of the Civil War, women's rights advocates renewed the struggle which had lain fallow as the North concentrated on saving the Union. In 1869, Susan Anthony and her associate Elizabeth Cady Stanton formed the National Women's Suffrage Association and a national newspaper, The Revolution, which in its short life vigorously addressed women's issues including problems they faced in the workplace. Despite the good reception Anthony was receiving around the country, it seemed to her that little real progress was being made, therefore she decided to take more direct action. In the elections of November 1872, she and a handful of women walked into the Rochester, New York registration office and demanded to be registered as voters. Four days later they cast their ballots, three weeks after that, Anthony was arrested.

 

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Susan B Anthony I

Lead: In a life devoted to various causes, Susan B. Anthony proved herself in many ways far ahead of her times.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: Susan Brownell Anthony was born in 1820 in Adams, Massachusetts. Her father was a prosperous cotton manufacturer. A Quaker and an abolitionist, a man who hated alcohol, Daniel Anthony who gave his daughter a strict upbringing and demonstrated a zeal for moral crusading that Susan would follow for the rest of her life.

 

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Miss Maggie Walker of Richmond

Lead: One of the most remarkable women of the twentieth century was the daughter of an ex-slave.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Turn-of-the-century Richmond, Virginia had come back from the Civil War. With their city the Black Community of Richmond was enjoying a comparable renaissance. Blacks owned and operated stables, retail stores, restaurants and were making an important contribution to the industrial growth of the New South.

 

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Coretta Scott King II

Lead: In the years before and after the assassination of her husband, Coretta Scott King provided strong leadership within the civil rights movement.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was not easy residing at the center of the maelstrom, raising a large family, taking a supportive role at the side of one of humanity’s most consequential figures, but, nevertheless, Coretta King rose to take the role of leader. She escaped and stood strong when white supremacists directed violence against their family. When Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was awarded the Nobel Peace prize, she was by his side.

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