Elizabeth Zane and the Siege of Fort Henry

Lead: In one of the last skirmishes of the American Revolution Betty Zane performed an act of exceptional heroism.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The City of Wheeling was established at the juncture of Wheeling Creek and the Ohio River in the panhandle of West Virginia. The name is taken from a Delaware Indian term meaning skull or head which refers to the beheading of a party of early settlers. The story of Elizabeth Zane comes out of that turbulent era.

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Carry Nation, Reformer

Lead: At six feet tall and 175 pounds, Carry Nation organized the shock troops of the temperance movement.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Carry Amelia Moore was born in Garrard County Kentucky in 1846. Her education was limited though she held a teaching certificate. She left her first marriage because of her husband’s alcoholism and soon married David Nation, a lawyer, journalist and minister. Religious convictions drove her deeper and deeper into opposition to the sale and consumption of alcohol. For Carry Nation, drinking liquor was a moral question and fighting it became for her a crusade.

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Lead: She was Harriet Beecher Stowe, the little lady who made the big war.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1850 a series of laws were passed by the Congress of the United States that came to be known as the Compromise of 1850. This secured relative peace between North and South and delayed by a decade the coming Civil War. One the parts of the compromise was a strengthened Fugitive Slave Law. It was passed to block the growing campaign by abolitionists and others opposed to slavery who were trying to help slaves escape captivity.

 

 

Elizabeth Canning

Lead: The alleged abduction and confinement in early 1753 of eighteen-year-old London servant girl Elizabeth Canning electrified and later divided British society. Historians are still trying to explain just what happened.

                Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: On nearly every aspect of the Canning case there is dispute. The quiet, unassuming maidservant of cabinet-maker Edward Lyon disappeared on New Years Day and was gone for almost a month. When she returned on foot to her mother’s house on January 29, 1753, she spun an incredible story. Abducted on the street by two toughs she was taken by carriage to Enfield a tiny village just outside London and there rendered into the hands of a prostitute, Mother Wells. Wells and her cronish gypsy associate Mary Squires, attempted to recruit Canning to work in their brothel. When Canning refused, Squires cut off the girl’s corset stays and locked her in the attic. Canning subsisted on bread and water for nearly a month and then escaped.

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Medieval Women: Christine de Pizan – Part III

Lead: Often considered the first feminist and professional writer, Christine de Pizan began her literary career in medieval France in 1390.

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: Christine de Pizan, though Italian at birth, was raised in the French court of King Charles V – her father and then her husband were court advisors. Encouraged by her father and later by her husband, Christine received a comprehensive, classical education in the court.

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Medieval Women: Christine de Pizan – Part II

Lead: Out of 14th century has emerged one of the notable voices articulating an early vision of full participation in the social and political life for women, the proto-feminist Christine de Pizan

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Medieval author Christine de Pizan is considered by many to be the first feminist voice. She lived at a time when women had limited legal rights and were considered the property of a father or husband. She was born in Venice, Italy, in 1364. Christine’s father, Tomasso de Pizzano, was a well-respected physician and astrologer. When she was five years old her father accepted a position as court astrologer and secretary to King Charles V of France. Growing up at the French Court, with her father’s approval and encouragement, the studious and bright Christine received an excellent education studying literature, history, religion and classical languages.

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Medieval Women – I

Lead: The vision of medieval women that has emerged in the popular imagination is that of idealized caricature, instead they were full participants in life, good and bad

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Thomas Hobbes, writing in the seventeenth century, wrote that the lot of man was, “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.” His reference was much broader than any single epoch, but surely the medieval period in Europe was, for many of its inhabitants, little better than that. Yet, the era had periods of brilliant accomplishment, when men and women rose above their straightened circumstances to achieve greatness. For the most part, however, life was a struggle against poverty and disease, corruption, lawlessness and early death.

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Leadership: Candy Lightener – The MADD Queen – I

Lead: Social movements often require charismatic leadership in the early stages, but needs change with growth. Consider the case of Candy Lightner, the founder of Mothers Against Drunk Driving.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: On the afternoon of May 3, 1980, Clarence Busch, plowed his automobile into 13-year old Cari Lightner who was walking in the bike lane on the way to church. So hard was she hit that her body flew 120 feet in the air. So severe were her injuries, she died a hour later. Clarence Busch was drunk and not surprisingly fled the scene. He had two previous convictions for driving driving drunk and had served jail time for hit and run.

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