First Ladies: Bess Truman

Lead: She didn’t like politics and thought of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue as the “Great White Jail, but she loved Harry Truman and if he wanted to live there she would be his partner in life and service.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Harry Truman first met Elizabeth Virginia Wallace at the Sunday School of the Presbyterian Church in Independence, Missouri. He was six, she was five. Until his death in 1972 at eighty-nine she never was far from his thoughts. Pursuing Bess was not easy. He was from a family of dirt farmers, she from one of the wealthiest in town. It took a long time and a lot of work on his part for Madge Wallace to warm to Harry and for the balance of her life Mother Wallace was a member of the Truman household, part of the price he paid to win Bess.

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Women Slaves – Elizabeth Hobbs Keckley – Part II

Lead: In 1861 dressmaker Elizabeth Keckley, former slave from Virginia, became the personal dressmaker and confidante of the President of the United States, Mary Todd Lincoln.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: In early 1861, Mrs. Lincoln accidentally spilled coffee on the gown she was to wear to the Inaugural Ball. A friend recommended Elizabeth Keckley the finest dressmaker in the District. The Lincolns were so pleased with her work that Mary Lincoln hired Lizzie as a dressmaker and personal maid. The two forged a friendship that would last for years. Lizzie became the First Lady’s closest friend and confidante during the Lincolns’ four years in the White House.

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The Last Full Measure – Rose Greenhow

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the summer of 1861 Washington hostess Rose Greenhow helped the infant Confederacy win the First Battle of Manassas at Bull Run Creek. Rose was born to a slaveholding family in southern Maryland in 1817. As a young woman, she moved to Washington City to live with her aunt who ran a boarding house in the Old Capitol Building. She earned the nickname “Wild Rose.” Charming, intelligent, and witty, Rose entertained frequently and cultivated friendships with some of the most powerful political figures of her time in Washington’s antebellum society.

 

Laura Ingalls Wilder

Lead: In 1930 Laura Ingalls Wilder began writing about her childlhood experiences on the American frontier. The result was classic literature read by young people and adults throughout the world.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                 Content: The inspiration came from her daughter, Laura Lane, a San Francisco journalist. Then in her mid-sixties, Laura Wilder, writing on school tablets and using pencils, created eight loosely autobiographical novels, known collectively as the “Little House Books,” published between 1932 and 1943. They have been praised as vividly detailing frontier domestic life, seen through the eyes of a young girl.

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Nancy Langhorne Astor – II

Lead: After a trophy marriage to a wealthy British aristocrat, Nancy Langhorne Astor of Danville Virginia, first woman in parliament,  became one of the most famous women in the world.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: after being a lack did to the British Parliament in 1910, Waldorf Astor became a rising political star.  His career came abruptly to an end in October 1919 when his father died and he succeeded to the elder Astor's noble title. After he resigned from the House of Commons to take a seat in the Lords, Waldorf began to promote his wife as a substitute.

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Nancy Langhorne Astor – I

Lead: born the third daughter of eight surviving children, Nancy Witcher Langhorne Astor, one of the world's most famous women, prevailed as a girl, through the use of a rapier wit and prodigious energy.

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: By the time Nancy was born in 1879, Chiswell Dabney Langhorne had recovered his fortune. He had been a wealthy farmer before the Civil War but struggled financially in the little southside Virginia tobacco town of Danville.

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