A House Divided: (32) Collapse of the Whig Party – III

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the end of the 1830s no significant subject in American political life could be discussed without reference to the enormous social, economic and moral issue of slavery. Americans were losing control of their ability to have a rational conversation. No national discussion was possible without dragging in the way in which it would affect the progress, expansion, restriction, or destruction of slavery. Whether it was tariffs, internal improvements, foreign affairs, economics, public education western expansion, the Transcontinental Railroad, the War in Mexico, all were affected by this question. Most American’s opinion on one issue was shaded by their opinion on The Issue.  

A House Divided: (31) Collapse of the Whig Party – II

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The term “whig” comes out of English political history and is derived from the Scottish word “whiggamor” or cattle driver. It was a term of abuse and derision directed against Scottish Covenanter Presbyterian opponents of King Charles I. It came into wide use in the “Exclusion Crisis” of the 1680s and was applied to those who wished to exclude from the English throne, James, Duke of York, the brother of King Charles II, because James was a Roman Catholic.

A House Divided: (30) Collapse of the Whig Party – I

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The founders of the United States felt that political parties were abhorrent. George Washington feared partisanship would lead to division and political gridlock though many in his administration identified themselves as members of the Federalist Party. In The Federalist Papers Alexander Hamilton and James Madison warned against the dangers of factional politics, yet Hamilton became the quintessential Federalist and Madison soon identified himself before and after the White House with Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party. For all these early warnings, Americans, as did their leaders, quickly divided into political factions.