Fulton’s Folly – Part II

Lead: On August 17, 1807, Robert Fulton, in a thirty-two-hour experimental excursion, ushered in of a new era of transportation. Steam power took to water.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Fulton, artist, inventor and engineer, directed the construction of a steamboat he had conceived while previously living in Paris, working there on canal and submarine designs. It was in the French capital that Fulton met the American minister to Napoleon’s government, Robert Livingston a wealthy and aristocratic New York businessman. Livingston contracted with Fulton to design a commercial steamboat for use on the Hudson River. Although his was not the first steamboat, Fulton demonstrated conclusively this means of propulsion was a much needed and practical form of transportation.

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Fulton’s Folly – Part I

Lead: On August 17, 1807, from the shoreline of the Hudson River, spectators witnessed a shocking sight. There in the river was a mechanical monster spewing flames and smoke. It was Mr. Fulton’s Folly.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Robert Fulton’s first steamboat ushered in a new era of transportation and industrialization. The North River Steamboat of Clermont, later simply referred to as Clermont, was named after the early Dutch name for the Hudson River. Clermont was the hometown of Fulton’s partner and financier, Robert Livingston, prominent New York lawyer, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and former minister to France.

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Titanic – Part III

Lead:  When HMS Titanic went to a watery grave on her maiden voyage in the spring of 1912, heroes were common. Harold Bride tells the story of one.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At the age of twenty-one, Harold Bride considered himself quite lucky. He landed a job as the assistant wireless operator of the brand new passenger liner, the White Star Titanic. Had he had the time, Bride might have enjoyed the excitement of the ship's maiden voyage. Titanic carried more than 2000 passengers on that first transatlantic trip, but an insufficient number of lifeboats. Such a fact seemed inconsequential in view of the common belief that the ship was unsinkable.

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