Arthur Ashe

Lead: Even as a youth growing up in Richmond, Virginia, tennis legend Arthur Ashe refused to be blocked from pursuing his dreams and broke through physical and racial barriers to achieve them.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Tennis player, author, and social activist, Arthur Ashe, was born in the capital of the former Confederacy in 1943. Segregation was king and blacks were second-class citizens. Even after federal courts had brought an end to legal segregation, the insidious poison of social bigotry remained all across the country, but especially in the South. Not only were talented African Americans denied equal opportunity in education, business and social institutions, but ironically at the time, also in sports and recreation.

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Tragedy at the Munich Olympics I

Lead: The tragic murder of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics rested on the crossroads of opportunity inhabited by the West German government and Black September, the spin-off of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO).

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is not that they didn’t try. Though they were morally and ideologically poles apart, the Nazi government of Adolf Hitler and the democratically elected German Republic attempted to use the Olympic Games, 1936 and 1972, to improve their international public relations. In both cases they largely failed.

 

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Pete Rozelle and the Modern National Football League

Lead: For 21st Century fans his name is a distant memory, but if you like NFL football, you can thank Pete Rozelle.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: When Rozelle became NFL Commissioner in 1960, his part of professional football was a chaotic mess. It consisted of 12 teams owned by 12 megalomaniacs with the new American Football League threatening them all with competition and doom.

 

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Black Sox I

Lead: America was just about begin its "return to normalcy" under Warren Gamaliel Harding when in the fall of 1920 a Chicago Grand Jury indicted eight White Sox players for throwing the 1919 World Series in what became the Black Sox Scandal.

Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1919, the Chicago White Sox were one of the finest teams in the history of baseball. The team's talent was in depth with excellent batting and several positions covered by more than a single outstanding player. In left field was Joe Jackson, one of the game's great hitters. On the mound spit-ball specialist Eddie Cicotte alternated with Claude "Lefty" Williams for pitching honors. They romped through American League during the season and were highly favored to beat the lack-luster National League contenders, the Cincinnati Reds. However, in one of baseball's most sensational reverses, the White Sox had lost. Even before the first game rumors were flying that the fix was in and that several White Sox players had conspired to throw the series.

 

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Jackie Robinson Stays Put

Lead: On a summer evening in 1944 at Camp Hood near Waco, Texas, Lt. Jackie Robinson refused to go to the back of the bus.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As much as the denial of political rights, petty segregation, such as separate accommodations, restricted bathrooms, having to sit at the back of the bus, posed during most of the twentieth century a constant reminder to African-Americans of their second-class citizenship. While on active duty in the United States Army during World War II, future Brooklyn Dodger star, Jackie Robinson struck a small blow for equality.

 

 

Time Capsule 1980: The Boycott of the Moscow Summer Olympics

Lead:  When the 1980 Olympic Summer Games were held in Moscow, over sixty nations were missing. The boycott was led by the United States as a protest over the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.    

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In December 1979 Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan to support and stabilize the communist regime, at that time facing growing resistance among the Afghan people. The locals responded to the invasion with an insurgent war in one of most rugged and harsh climates in the world.

 

Miracle on Ice

Lead: One of the twentieth century’s most exhilarating moments in sports transformed the closing moments of the 1980 Winter Olympics ice hockey championship into a “Miracle on Ice.”

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The “Miracle on Ice” of course refers to the United States ice hockey team victory over the Soviet Union in Lake Placid, New York.  When the two teams met on February 22nd, the U.S. team was the clear underdog. The Soviet Union had blown the U.S. team away at an exhibition game earlier in the month at Madison Square Garden and had dominated ice hockey in the Olympics since 1964. It was considered the world’s most formidable hockey machine – routinely winning international competitions.