US Olympic Basketball Team Loses to Soviets II

Lead: In the final game of the 1972 Summer Olympic basketball competition, the Soviet Union’s team won but under circumstances that remain questionable to many even to this day.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Politics are never very far from the Olympics. Nations use the games and their athletes to prove the superior worth of their political and social systems. During periods of high tension like the cold war, antagonists such as the United States and the Soviets, opponents in other arenas, economic, political and military, sought to use the Olympics as an extension of warfare to the track, the swimming pool, the parallel bars and, in 1972, to the basketball court.

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US Olympic Basketball Team Loses to Soviets I

Lead: In a heart-breaking and controversial final result, the 1972 U.S. Olympic Basketball team lost to the Soviet Union. The game remains a subject of bitter dispute to this day.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The 1972 Olympic Games in Munich were supposed to be the happy games. They were designed by West Germany to erase the memory of the 1936 Hitler games with all their overt Nazi propaganda and the terrible aftermath of war and Holocaust. Such was not to be. On September 5th, eight terrorists from Black September, a Palestinian organization linked to Fatah, broke into the Olympic village and took nine Israeli Olympians hostage in their apartments. Eighteen hours later the crisis came to a climax and eventually ended in a failed rescue attempt at a nearby military airfield. The tragic deaths of all the Israelis cast a pall over the summer games which, despite the hostage incident, Olympic officials declared must continue.

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Berlin Spy Tunnel II

Lead:  In 1954 the Central Intelligence Agency dug a 1400 foot tunnel under the border of East Berlin to spy on Soviet military messages. It was an engineering triumph, but there was one hitch. The Soviets knew it was there.

Tag: "A Moment In Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: George Blake was a member of the British Secret Intelligence Service. During the early days of the Korean War he was captured by the North Koreans and held for three years. Sometime during his prison stay he went over to the other side. In 1954, when the spy tunnel was first discussed by the CIA and its British counterpart, MI6, Blake was in the meeting, took extensive notes, and passed the sketches and drawings to his KGB control officer within two days.

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Berlin Spy Tunnel I

Lead:  In 1954, at the height of the Cold War, the CIA and British MI6 dug a tunnel under divided Berlin to spy on the Russians. They thought it was a secret.

 Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: The city of Berlin during the 1950s was divided east and west and was the focus of much tension between the Soviet Union and the western Allies.  It was also crawling with spies. One of those was the CIA's station chief in Berlin, William King Harvey. He received information that the Soviets had laid three telephone and telegraph cables 18 inches beneath the soil near the road to Shönefeld Airport. Over these lines the Soviet military command in Berlin communicated with Moscow. Building on the experience of the British who had conducted a similar but smaller operation against the Soviets in Vienna, Harvey convinced his bosses to construct a tunnel, intercept the cables and tap them.

 

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The Berlin Airlift – II

Lead: In the summer of 1948 Soviet occupation forces established a full blockade on the City of West Berlin. The allies responded with a giant airlift.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Since the fall of Nazi Germany in 1945, Berlin had been a growing source of bitter contention between the Soviets and their former wartime allies. By 1948, the United States, Britain and France were moving to merge those zones of Germany and Berlin they occupied into a single nation. This posed a threat to Russia and on July 24, 1948 it retaliated with an bold attempt to cut off West Berlin from outside contact and vital supplies of electricity, coal, and food. In a city of 2.5 million there was only food sufficient for 35 days.

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The Berlin Airlift – I

Lead: By July 1948 the Soviet Union no longer was willing to tolerate West Berlin.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: As the end of World War II drew near, the alliance that had hammered Germany into submission began to fall apart. After the war, the Soviet Union forced communist governments on most of those Eastern European nations its army had occupied and erected barriers to impede communications, trade and travel between East and West. Yet, it was Germany that would prove to be the most serious irritant between the two emerging Cold War coalitions. The Soviets occupied the eastern zone while the western zones of Germany were administered by the United States, France and Britain.

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The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk – Part II

Lead:  When Lenin and the Bolsheviks took power in Russia in October, 1917, the most important task before them was to stop the war.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: World War I went badly for the Russians. Continued defeat and incompetence had brought down the Czarist regime and the provisional government that followed it. In their place were Lenin and the Bolsheviks. He knew if their regime was to survive, they had to have peace, no matter what it cost.

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Treaty of Brest-Litovsk – Part I

Lead:  After nearly four years of fighting Russia desperately needed peace - at any price.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By March, 1918, years of warfare had finally taken their toll on the Russian people. The war had gone badly, with German forces racking up one victory after another. There were two million Russian casualties in 1915 alone. Czar Nicholas II had proven to be a profoundly incompetent war leader, so anxious to maintain supreme royal power that he ignored the Duma, the elected legislature. In 1916, no longer willing to listen to the Duma's criticism, he adjourned it and went to the front. His wife, Czarina Alexandra, tried to rule in his absence, but she was equally incompetent and brought scandal to the government by her emotional dependence on the mystic priest Rasputin. His murder by three discontented aristocrats did little to improve the morale of the country and in March, 1917 severe food shortages brought an abrupt end to the famed Russian tolerance of misfortune. The nation snapped. Food riots led to revolution. When the soldiers sent to quell the riots joined in, the Duma declared a provisional government and three days later the Czar abdicated.

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