Nat Turner, Slave Rebellion II

Lead: Even as a child, people could tell Nat Turner was exceptional. His intelligence and physical presence marked him for leadership in the slave community of south-side Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Benjamin Turner owned a small plantation outside the town of Cross Keys in the Virginia county of Southampton, nestled on the North Carolina border 70 miles southeast of Richmond. His land was heavily forested and only about 100 acres were under cultivation. It was enough, however, for him to afford to keep slaves, the mark of status in the South, and in 1799 he bought a slave woman freshly arrived from Africa. He named her Nancy and in the next year she gave birth to Nathaniel.

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Nat Turner, Slave Rebellion I

Lead: In August 1831 the southside Virginia county of Southhampton was convulsed by the deadliest slave rebellion in North American history. One of roots of the rebellion was Southern white ambivalence about slavery.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Despite the growing economic dependence upon slave labor in the American South after the Revolution, there was powerful ambivalence among many Southerners about the institution of slavery. It mocked the philosophical foundation of the republic itself, violating the principles animating the Declaration of Independence. Many religious groups were increasingly vocal about the immorality of slavery. Quakers, anti-slavery Baptists, and, before 1800, Methodists vigorously denounced the practice and encouraged slave owners to manumit their slaves. In the North, slavery was gradually eliminated by custom, sentiment, and legal prohibition, so that the South became increasingly isolated in the national debate.

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A House Divided: Emancipation Strategy IV

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As the Civil War deepened and as the blood and sacrifice on both sides became more profound, Abraham Lincoln began seeking an edge to improve the Union’s chances of prevailing. After a stream of good news from the West earlier in the year, by summer 1862 Union military fortunes had fallen on hard times. Lincoln began to consider striking a powerful economic and, as it turned out, military blow against the rebels. He had begun to formulate an Emancipation Proclamation. Lincoln started looking for the opportune moment to issue it, meaning he needed a Union victory so as to insure that such a revolutionary and precipitous move might not seem to be an act of desperation.

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A House Divided: Emancipation Strategy III

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Southerners were determined to preserve slavery and willing to fight for the independence that would insure that institution’s continuance. Northern Democrats supported the Union but were split between those who favored the war to force the South to give up its quest for independence and those who wished to treat with the South to effect a voluntary restoration of national unity. Yet, both War and Peace Democrats were absolutely opposed to any notion of interfering with slavery. They were united in their desire to preserve a white America and rejected abolition in any form.

 

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A House Divided: Emancipation Strategy II

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: American political parties are essentially coalitions with a variety of opinions and social and economic impulses gathered under a single political tent organized to recruit, fund, and elect candidates for office at various levels. The bigger the tent, so the theory goes, the greater the party’s success.

 

 

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A House Divided: Emancipation Strategy I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the Civil War began there was a decided difference in its perceived purpose North and South. The Confederacy desired its independence primarily so that it might preserve its way of life, most particularly the institution of slavery. Southerners were quite clear. The Yankees could let them go out of the Union without a fight, but they would indeed fight if pressed, and their purpose was to maintain slavery. The Southern constitution expressly protects the institution of slavery and the ownership of slaves. Though a minority of Southerners actually owned slaves, the Confederate enterprise, its economy, its society, and its military initiatives and strategy were all designed to preserve that peculiar institution. Asserting states’ rights was the South’s clarion intellectual formulation, but the region departed the Union because it clearly saw that with every passing year American society was become more and more hostile to the state’s rights in maintaining slavery. 

 

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Slaves in Ante-Bellum South I

Lead: On August, 18, 1587, the first child of English parentage was born in the New World. The fate of tiny Virginia Dare is caught up in one of history’s great mysteries – The Lost Colony.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Optimistic about successful colonization of the New World, one of English Queen Elizabeth’s favorites, Sir Walter Raleigh, attempted expeditions to Virginia in the 1580s. The first failed but he sent a second in 1587. This group of 117, including men, women and children, departed Plymouth on May 8th. Their intended destination was further north in the Chesapeake region, but for reasons not completely clear, possibly due to hurricane season, the pilot refused to continue, and in mid-July dropped them on Roanoke Island just off what would become the Carolina mainland.

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William Wilberforce and the Abolition of Slavery – IV

Lead: The seemingly impregnable structure of slavery in the British Empire fell in part before the persistent efforts of William Wilberforce.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After undergoing a gradual religious conversion in the 1880s, member of Parliament, William Wilberforce, felt himself compelled to embrace moral causes. He was approached by abolitionists seeking someone to lead the parliamentary campaign to end slavery. He was hesitant at first because of the powerful entrenched interests that supported slavery. Trade in human flesh was big business. Thousands of slaves, hundreds of ships and millions of pounds were involved. Few whites in England or elsewhere considered slavery to be morally wrong. Some believed
slavery was essential for the preservation of society. Others were convinced that slaves deserved to be held in bondage.

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