William Wallace I

Lead: As the ages pass, accurate portraits of historic persons are hard to come by. The Scottish patriot and guerilla leader William Wallace is one such figure in whom legend and reality mix in fanciful confusion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Historian Ernest Renan insists that ‘forgetting history’ or perpetuating ‘historical error’ are essential in the formation of a nation. As Graeme Morton points out, Renan’s conclusions work precisely in the case of William Wallace. The Scottish rogue was a child of wealth and privilege, son of a knight, grandson of a sheriff, born in County Ayr in southwest Scotland. He was a teenager in 1286 when Scottish King Alexander III died leaving as heir a four-year old daughter living in Norway. Her death four years later left the succession and Scotland in hopeless confusion. Scottish independence was imperiled by the struggle for the throne within the Scottish aristocracy, but also by the imperial intentions of English King Edward I known as “Old Longshanks” because of his height.

 

Independence for Scotland – II

Lead: With the end of William Wallace’s rebellion, Scotland settled into a troubled acceptance of English King Edward I direct rule. Robert Bruce began to plan otherwise.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: From 1295 to 1306 the political situation in Scotland was chaotic. Edward I wished to rule directly and, after defeating the forces of Sir William Wallace at Falkirk in 1298, gradually brought the Scottish nobility to heel. One noble, however, Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick, entertained private ambitions. His support for Wallace had been an off and on thing, but he had regained Edward’s confidence. 

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Independence for Scotland – I

Lead: Two leaders led Scotland in its long medieval struggle for independence from England, Robert Bruce and William Wallace.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Throughout the high medieval period, with varying degrees of success, the rulers of England laid claim to be feudal Lord Paramount of Scotland. Whenever there was dispute among the Scottish nobility about succession to the throne, English kings would insert themselves into Scottish politics in an attempt to secure a candidate that would do their bidding. Such a scenario occurred in the years following the death of King Alexander III in 1286. The succession was in dispute for nearly half a decade when English King Edward I intervened, and installed John Balliol as his candidate. Balliol proved himself an uncooperative and rebellious vassal and in 1296 Edward brought an Army north, crushed Balliol and assumed direct rule. It would not prove an easy time for Edward. He soon was forced to deal with one of Scotland’s authentic national heroes.

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