Anti-Semitism: Kielce Pogrom I

Lead:   “Pogroms” – organized attacks on Jews stirred by anti-Semitic sentiment - broke out across Russia in 1881. It was not the first time and most certainly would not be the last.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The word “pogrom” comes from the Russian word meaning “riot or wreak havoc.” A pogrom is a riot directed against a minority group – distinctive because of their religious or ethnic heritage. At times the attacks are led, encouraged and condoned by government authorities often to deflect public anger from leaders facing charges of incompetence or corruption.

 

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Gregori Potemkin – II

Lead: In 1787 Russian Field Marshall Grigori Potemkin, organized a tour of southern Russia for his former lover Catherine the Great. It was among the most lavish royal tours in Russian history.                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

Content: Girgori Potemkin was a young ambitious military officer when he took part in the palace coup that deposed Peter III, the estranged husband of Catherine the Great. As a reward for his skill and loyalty, Catherine made Potemkin a member of her court. He became infatuated with her. In 1768, when the first war with Turkey broke out, Potemkin returned to the military and served in the cavalry, rising to the rank of major general. For his distinguished service at the end of the war, Catherine made Potemkin a count and the two began a two-year affair. She said of him, “He is one of the greatest, most bizarre, and most entertaining eccentrics of this iron age." Even after their romantic liaison ended, Potemkin remained one of Catherine's most powerful, capable and influential advisors. When Catherine annexed the Crimea thus expanding  Russia's borders on the Black Sea, Potemkin served as governor of the new province and developed its infrastructure. Anxious to demonstrate his expertise, Potemkin organized a visit by the Empress to the Crimea in 1787.

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Gregori Potemkin – Part I

                Lead: In 1762, Grigori Potemkin, and ambitious young officer, secured his political and affectional future leading the coup that overthrew unpopular Czar Peter III in favor of his wife. She became Catherine the Great Grigory became her lover.               

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Grigori was born in 1739, studied at the University of Moscow and entered the military as quartermaster of horse guards. Catherine, ten years his senior was the daughter of a minor German prince married at age sixteen to Peter, heir to the Russian throne. Catherine on the other hand was ambitious, determined and bright and had acquired a brilliant education as young woman. By the time her husband ascended to the throne as Peter III in early 1762, Catherine disliked her husband intensely. He may have borne the name of his grandfather Peter the Great, but that is where the comparison ended. He was regarded as weak and incompetent and much of the court shared Czarina’s disdain for her husband. A mere six months after the coronation he was deposed in a palace coup d’etat and a short time later the Czar “died in an accident.” Actually he was murdered while in the custody of one of the conspirators. Power was handed to Catherine who ascended the throne with the support of her lover and chief schemer, Grigori Orlov.

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The Women’s Movement Pre-Revolutionary Russia – II

Lead: During the twenty-six year reign of Russian Czar Alexander II, which began in 1855, three major women’s movements arose to challenge the status quo.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Romanov Czar Alexander II, part of the Romanov line of Russian rulers, is known as the “czar liberator” because of his reforms and his emancipation in 1861 of 23 million Russian serfs - about half of the peasant class.

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The Women’s Movement Pre-Revolutionary Russia – I

                Lead: In 1861 Czar Alexander II of Russia freed the serfs. This act of emancipation helped fuel one of the most unlikely women’s liberation movements in  the nineteenth century. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Until the 1900s the legal and social position of women in Russia, indeed in most of the European world, was suppressed. A broad general belief, held by both sexes, was that men had the God-given right of dominion over women and children. This control, it was generally believed, provided structure for the family and a firm foundation for state and church order.

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Raoul Wallenberg: Angel of Life – Part IV

Lead:  Having played the central role in saving 100,000 Jews of Budapest, Raoul Wallenberg was arrested by the Russians.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the winter of 1945 the Russian Army arrived at the gates of the Hungarian capital. Wallenberg had developed a plan that would help bring a restoration of services and a quicker return to normalcy. He wished to discuss this with the Russian commander and the Provisional Hungarian Government located in a provincial town 130 miles from the capital city. Under Russian escort he left the City on January 17th. His associates never saw him again.

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