Elizabeth Zane and the Siege of Fort Henry

Lead: In one of the last skirmishes of the American Revolution Betty Zane performed an act of exceptional heroism.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The City of Wheeling was established at the juncture of Wheeling Creek and the Ohio River in the panhandle of West Virginia. The name is taken from a Delaware Indian term meaning skull or head which refers to the beheading of a party of early settlers. The story of Elizabeth Zane comes out of that turbulent era.

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Major Andre III

Lead: In late September, 1780 John Paulding, Isaac Van Wart and David Williams, three militiamen guarding the bridge near Tarrytown, New York were playing cards. They looked up and saw a stranger approaching. Paulding grabbed his musket and stepped into history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The militiamen were patrolling sections of Westchester County, north along the River from New York. Since the main focus of conflict in the American Revolution had by this time shifted south to the Carolinas and Virginia, this section of the Hudson Valley had become a sort of neutral territory inhabited by partisan bands on both sides who were often little more than outlaws with a political preference.

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Major Andre II

Lead: In the Spring of 1779 the British intelligence chief in the colonies received word that one of America's most famous war heroes was ready to defect to Britain.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1776 Benedict Arnold was a highly successful shipowner and merchant in New Haven, Connecticut. Despite his prosperity, he was considered by the finer families in town as a rather coarse interloper who consorted with ruffians. As the war approached he became a leader of a group of rough radicals who agitated for revolution and who harassed Loyalists in the name of patriotism. When fighting broke out in Massachusetts he volunteered and served as one of Ethan Allen's officers in the successful attack on Fort Ticonderoga, N.Y. in May 1775. At the Battle of Saratoga, until he was severely wounded, Arnold commanded several battalions in the decisive American victory.

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Major Andre I

Lead: In the Spring of 1779, the chief of British Intelligence in New York City, received a shocking message.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Except for occasional partisan raids, by 1780, military action in the American Revolution had largely shifted to the south where the British and American forces exchanged victories in the months leading up to the climactic British surrender at the Battle of Yorktown. In the northern colonies, the opposing armies stared warily at each other from behind lines often separated by stretches of neutral territory. One such was divided region was the Hudson Valley of New York. From his headquarters in New York City, British General Henry Clinton had developed an extensive spy network throughout the Valley, probing for weaknesses in the American line and stirring up trouble among the many in the area that quietly supported the British cause.

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Paul Revere’s Ride II

Lead: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow captured the excitement and import of Paul Revere's famous ride, but on that night’s events the poet did not get his facts quite right.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Sometime in the evening of April 18, 1775, Paul Revere discovered that his best laid plans were falling apart. It was discovered that the British had dispatched several hundred troops to capture colonial ammunition stored at Concord, Revere had pre-arranged a signal to fellow patriots waiting for news of the British route so the alarm could be spread. When Revere went over to Charlestown to check whether word had been sent, he discovered that his men were confused by "one if by land, two if by sea," and no one was doing anything. Revere borrowed a horse and was off.

 

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Molly Corbin, Revolutionary Soldier

Lead: During the Battle of Fort Washington in November, 1776 Molly Corbin fought the British as hard as any man.
Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.
Content: Margaret Corbin was a camp follower. At that time women were not allowed to join military units as combatants but most armies allowed a large number of women to accompany units on military campaigns. They performed tasks such as cleaning and cooking and due to their proximity to battle often got caught up in actual fighting. Mrs. Washington was a highly ranked camp follower. She often accompanied the General on his campaigns and was at his side during the dark winter of 1777 at Valley Forge. Many of these women were married, some were not and occasionally performing those rather dubious social duties associated with a large number of men alone far from home.