Little Jack Horner IV

Lead: Beginning in 1536, King Henry VIII of England began to confiscate the once-Catholic monasteries of England. His seizure of Glastonbury was made easier by the treachery of Thomas Horner.

Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Most of the monasteries submitted to this process with little resistance. Henry actually showed some compassion, giving some of the priests he considered unemployable a small pension for life, but those who resisted, he crushed ruthlessly. One those who held out was Richard Whiting, the Abbot of the ancient Cathedral at Glastonbury, near the western coast just south of Bristol. Whiting was eighty and had little to lose, but he tried to placate the King. He sent a Christmas present, the deed to twelve manorial estates which he hid in a Christmas pie. He entrusted this pastry delight to his steward, Thomas Horner, and sent him off to London. Horner was a realist. He knew very well that Whiting's gesture was useless. Henry would have Glastonbury. On the way, the disloyal steward popped open the pie and stole the deed to the rich manorial estate at Mells.

Read more →

Little Jack Horner III

Lead: Faced with confiscation, Abbot Richard Whiting of the Cathedral at Glastonbury, at Christmas 1539, sent his trusted steward, Thomas Horner with a gift to appease King Henry VIII. This futile gesture turned out to be rich opportunity for Jack Horner.

Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In its early years, the Reformation in England, was none to secure. King Henry VIII remained a theological and emotional Catholic until the day he died. The primary reason for removing England from allegiance to the Roman Church in 1534 was that the pope refused to give him a divorce from his first wife who could not produce for him a male heir. The Protestants around Henry were always a little nervous that the King, on a whim, might act on his true Catholic sentiments and go back to Rome. His chief minister, Thomas Cromwell, convinced the King that if he dissolved the monasteries of England he could accomplish two things. By confiscating them the King could fill his depleted treasury, something that always appealed to Henry, and, because many monasteries were hotbeds of Catholic sentiment, he could suppress a potential threat to the newly Protestant Church of England. In 1536, Henry and Cromwell began to close the monasteries. The King kept some for himself, but wisely distributed the balance to his family, friends and supporters throughout the realm. This land transfer meant a large number of influential people would be committed by pure self-interest to the survival of the Reformation.

Read more →

Little Jack Horner II

Lead: To get his hands on the monastic lands of Glastonbury Cathedral in 1539, King Henry VIII of England relied on the treachery of the Abbot's assistant, Thomas Horner.

Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: To secure his family's lock on the English throne, Henry VIII felt he had to have a male heir. Since his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, had failed to produce a son, he divorced her. To do so meant England had to renounce the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Pope. Henry became the Supreme Head of the Church and then, beginning in 1536, started closing the monasteries, many of which were lingering hotbeds of Catholic sentiment in England.

Read more →

Little Jack Horner I

Lead: "Little Jack Horner sat in a corner eating of Christmas pie,..." Legend has it that his name wasn't Jack but he definitely pulled out a plum.

Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: King Henry VIII of England had a serious problem. As he moved into middle age he began to despair of ever producing a son with his Queen Catherine of Aragon. She was deeply devoted to her husband but could not deliver to him the male heir which he was convinced would secure his family's lock on the English throne into the future. After repeated attempts to convince Pope Clement VII to dissolve his marriage, he renounced the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Church. With the Act of Supremacy in 1534, the King, not the Pope, became head of the Church in England. With this new power he divorced Catherine and married Anne Boleyn. Anne did not give him a son, but her successor, Jane Seymour, did and Henry considered his dynastic problems largely solved.

Read more →

Hugh O’Neill

Lead: For nearly one thousand years beginning in the the medieval period, England’s campaign to extend its control over Ireland, brought conflict, suffering and division to that island.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the middle ages, ambitious English Kings attempted to extend royal power over Ireland. It was not an easy task. The Irish did not anxiously surrender their homeland to the interloper. They considered their civilization to be older, richer, more pious and more learned than that of the upstart Anglo-Norman invaders, but English arms were stronger and could prevail in most circumstances.

Read more →

Hugh O’Neill II

Lead: Hugh O’Neill, 2nd Earl of Tyrone, balanced his commitments to friendship, ambition, clan and Ireland as England intensified its power over the Emerald Isle during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Among the numerous Gaelic clans of 16th century Ireland, the O’Donnells, O’Reillys, McGuires, Magennises, O’Brians, O’Kellys, MacCarthys and so on, none could claim more esteem and prominence than the O’Neills. The Great O’Neill, the allied families’ huge land holding covered a vast portion of modern Ulster’s former County Tyrone. Beginning in 1534, the English crown began a systematic extension of royal authority out from Pale, the area immediately adjacent to Dublin, across the entire island. This, the so-called Tudor conquest, ramped up the passion of centuries-old English imperial designs on the Emerald Isle and began decades of ever increasing conflict.

Read more →

Hugh O’Neill III

Lead: Raised in English homes after the death of his father in the 1550s, Hugh O’Neill, one of the claimants to the huge O’Neill estates in Northern Ireland, balanced affection, ambition and loyalty during the Tudor conquest.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: His grandfather, Conn O’Neill, was the last undisputed Great O’Neill, the ancient title carrying with it clan leadership and vast estates in Ulster. He achieved his position with the connivance of English crown authorities, but then mistakenly conferred his inheritance on an adopted son, Matthew Kelly, stirring up a harsh inner-clan dispute with Conn’s eldest son Shane O’Neill. As a result, Conn ended his life in bitter exile. Matthew’s orphan, Hugh O’Neill, was raised in English homes in the Pale and London, the most important of which was that of Sir Henry Sydney, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. The English obviously saw in Hugh O’Neill a native Irishman who could advance their cause in Ireland. After 1587, with English sponsorship, he became the 2nd Earl of Tyrone and gradually defeated his clan rivals, particularly Turlough Luineach (lin ek) O’Neill.

Read more →

Jonestown I

Lead: Over two decades Jim Jones grew his congregations through a combination of charismatic leadership and a message of equality and compassion. Yet, there was a dark side to Jim Jones. It led to mass murder and suicide.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Jim Jones was born James Warren Jones in Crete, Indiana. In 1955 he founded the People’s Temple in Indianapolis, Indiana. An independent minister, who later affiliated himself and was ordained by the Disciples of Christ, he preached against racism and attracted a large number of African American parishioners at a time when there were few integrated churches in America. An early member of the People’s Temple said he joined because it “espoused strong bible teachings and practical Christianity such as helping the poor, visiting the sick and following the actions of the Apostles.”

Read more →