US Olympic Basketball Team Loses to Soviets III

Lead: In September 1972 the United States lost the basketball final to the Soviets in one of the most disputed games in the modern Olympiad.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In the closing minutes of the game the United States was ahead because of a shot made by Doug Collins who then tackled probably on purpose by a Soviet player. During the free throws, apparently, the Soviet coach had tried to call a time-out, but that was against the rules. Despite this, the refs, in of the sport’s most controversial calls, gave the Soviets the time out and a second chance. They were unable to score even with the added time. The American contingent was apoplectic with joyful celebration.

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US Olympic Basketball Team Loses to Soviets II

Lead: In the final game of the 1972 Summer Olympic basketball competition, the Soviet Union’s team won but under circumstances that remain questionable to many even to this day.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Politics are never very far from the Olympics. Nations use the games and their athletes to prove the superior worth of their political and social systems. During periods of high tension like the cold war, antagonists such as the United States and the Soviets, opponents in other arenas, economic, political and military, sought to use the Olympics as an extension of warfare to the track, the swimming pool, the parallel bars and, in 1972, to the basketball court.

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US Olympic Basketball Team Loses to Soviets I

Lead: In a heart-breaking and controversial final result, the 1972 U.S. Olympic Basketball team lost to the Soviet Union. The game remains a subject of bitter dispute to this day.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The 1972 Olympic Games in Munich were supposed to be the happy games. They were designed by West Germany to erase the memory of the 1936 Hitler games with all their overt Nazi propaganda and the terrible aftermath of war and Holocaust. Such was not to be. On September 5th, eight terrorists from Black September, a Palestinian organization linked to Fatah, broke into the Olympic village and took nine Israeli Olympians hostage in their apartments. Eighteen hours later the crisis came to a climax and eventually ended in a failed rescue attempt at a nearby military airfield. The tragic deaths of all the Israelis cast a pall over the summer games which, despite the hostage incident, Olympic officials declared must continue.

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Birth of Modern Olympics – II

Lead: There were several whose work led to the modern Olympic games, but the most prominent of the founders was a Frenchman, Baron Pierre de Coubertin. His persistence in the face of universal apathy brought the Olympics to re-birth.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: As a young man, Coubertin came under the allure of the victorian English public school system. The portal through which he examined it was a French translation of Tom Brown’s Schooldays. It was romping fictional account of life at Rugby School in the 1830s by the school’s innovative headmaster, Thomas Hughes. Coubertin became a life-long devotee of the English emphasis on sport as an integral part of character development and an important part of basic education as a civilizing influence.

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Birth of Modern Olympics – I

Lead: Born of optimism about the human spirit and steeped in nineteenth century ideals of progress, the modern Olympics were designed to promote international good will, healthy living and peace. It did not always work out that way.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Ever since Coro ‘ebus, a young El’ean cook, prevailed in the 200 meter dash in 776 B.C., the Olympic games have been a source of inspiration and controversy. For more than a thousand years, each quadrennial, spectators and athletes, fans and opportunists would make the uncomfortable summer journey to the shrine of the god Zeus for the games. They were held on the Olympian plain in the northwest corner of Greece’s Peloponnesian peninsula.

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