Leadership: Wilma Mankiller

Lead: Leadership often comes from the most unlikely persons. In 1985 Wilma Mankiller became the first female chief of a major Indian tribe. Her leadership style and methods were quiet but very effective.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Mankiller was one of eleven children born in Tahlequah, Oklahoma in 1945. She was named for a Cherokee ancestor, a high-ranking warrior of ancient lineage. Wilma grew up in rural, impoverished Mankiller Flats on land given to her paternal grandfather in 1907 when Oklahoma achieved statehood. In the mid-1950s drought and the attending failure of their farm forced the family to move to San Francisco as part of the Bureau of Indian Affairs Relocation Program. This program was established to help resettle poor rural Native Americans in an urban setting.

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Leadership: The Pyrrhic Leadership of Sitting Bull

Lead: For a brilliant moment on that afternoon late June 1876, it seemed that he was right. Custer was dead and all his men with him, but like King Pyrrhus against the Romans before him, Sitting Bull found his victory of too great a cost.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Sitting Bull once said to General Miles, “….God Almighty made me an Indian, but he didn’t make me an agency Indian, and I don’t intend to be one,”

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Jamestown Journey: John Rolfe – II

Lead: In 1616 Mr. and Mrs. John Rolfe and their infant son Thomas, sailed for England. There John and Pocahontas took the country by storm, impressing investors and emigrants with the opportunities to be had in Virginia.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Through his experimenting with the sweet Caribbean variety of tobacco, John Rolfe had discovered the key to Virginia's economic salvation. His marriage to Pocahontas had secured a welcome respite in tension between Native Americans and the settlers. Two years after their marriage he brought his family with Governor Sir Thomas Dale to England to encourage financial support for the colony and recruitment for settlers.

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Jamestown Journey: Native American Democracy III

Lead: In the 1980s a group of scholars suggested that Native Americans might have had a part in shaping American government. Academic war followed. 

                Intro.: Dan Roberts and 'A Moment in Time,' with 'Jamestown - Journey of Democracy,' tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

                Content: The study of history can be a minefield for those who have a new idea. When in the 1980s historians Bruce Johansen, Donald Grinde and Barbara Mann began to suggest that Native American concepts and practices, specifically the Great Law of the Haudenosaunee (ho dee noe sho nee), the Iroquois Alliance, may have had some influence on the construct of the new American republic, they found themselves in the center of bitter, scholarly and cultural debate.

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Jamestown Journey: Native American Democracy II

Lead: Among the Founders of the American republic, there was a profound respect for the political and diplomatic accomplishments of the Iroquois Federation.

            Intro.: Dan Roberts and 'A Moment in Time,' with 'Jamestown - Journey of Democracy,' tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

            Content: Democracy is a fleeting and precious thing. Rule of the people, by the people and for the people has clearly been the exception in a sordid history of monarchies, oligarchies, dictatorships and aristocracies. More often than not men and women have suffered under the rule of their so-called betters.

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Jamestown Journey: Native American Democracy I

Lead: In 1754  Benjamin Franklin modeled a colonial Plan of Union on that of the Six Nations of the Haudenosaunee (ho dee noe sho nee), the Iroquois.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and 'A Moment in Time,' with 'Jamestown - Journey of Democracy,' tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

                Content: By 1725 the English colonies of North America were pretty much established. These societies were, however, precariously perched on the Eastern seaboard. The faced westward into an enormous continental expanse filled with a large population of indigenous Americans, highly skeptical of English intentions and correctly suspicious that the colonists had designs on Indian land. Equally threatening was the growing presence of the French in what became Canada and the Mississippi Valley.

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America’s First Century: Algonquian Annihilation – II

Lead: After 1607 relations between the Jamestown English and the Chesapeake Powhatan confederation were nearly always hostile. Combined with disease and starvation, Native Americans soon faced almost complete annihilation.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Any fair and balanced study of the early years of English settlement of Virginia cannot help but provoke admiration. A primitive democracy was established. Tobacco cultivation laid the foundation for a rich commercial culture. Despite disease, starvation, bad water, and ineffective leadership, Virginians survived and gradually, fitfully established a European toe-hold on the Chesapeake. People of faith believing that Christianity brings a positive civilizing uplift, may celebrate the change in the slaves and the few Indians so converted.

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