King Philip’s War

Lead: In the early days of Plymouth Colony, John Carver, the Governor signed a treaty of peace with the dominant tribe in the area near its place of settlement.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: For the most part of the early years New England's Puritans and the Indians got along remarkably well. The Puritans were not interested in stamping out the Indians or removing them. Indeed, many of them wanted to bring to the Native Americans the blessings of the Puritan faith and English civilization. Even when there were wars between 1620 and 1677 it was not strictly Native American against settler but in fact many of the Indian tribes fought on the size of the colonists. About 1670s, 4000 Indians were living among the English settlers and many of them had been converted to Christianity.

Read more →

Last Full Measure – Wovoka, Ghost Dancer

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time (is presented by the people of _________ and) is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the late 1880s many of the Plains tribes had been forced onto reservations. With their main source of food, the buffalo, hunted to near extinction, hunger and disease were rampant. Mismanagement and corruption within the Bureau of Indian Affairs resulted in a lack of rations and supplies and overall poor living conditions. In the wake of hopelessness and despair, a religious movement spread through Indian encampments throughout the west.

 

Read more →

The Demise of George Armstrong Custer IV

Lead: During the afternoon of June 25, 1876 Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer led el-ements of the Seventh United States Cavalry to their deaths.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Operating on the supreme confidence that had nearly always attended his military service, George Custer in a race with time and driven by political ambition, de-scended into the valley of the Little Bighorn in southern Montana. He was in pursuit of a group of Indian clans most prominent of which was the Sioux who led by their Chief Sitting Bull, had slipped off their reservation in what is now western South Dakota. His greatest problem? Custer was significantly outnumbered. The Seventh Cavalry with fewer than seven hundred troopers faced perhaps the largest concentration of hostile native Americans ever to assemble in one place.

The Demise of George Armstrong Custer III

Lead: Colonel Custer took the old telescope from the hands of the crow scout and peered into the valley of death.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: George Armstrong Custer, leading the Seventh United States Cavalry Reg-iment, was participating in a three army campaign. They were sent by General Philip Sher-idan to discipline several warlike Indian tribes who by spring of 1876 had drifted off their reservations into the valley of the Little Bighorn River in southern Montana. Custer's regi-ment was part of the army led by General Alfred Terry which had left Fort Abraham Lin-coln on the Missouri River in June. The object of the three armies was to converge, find the wandering Indians, punish them and drag them chastened back to the reservation.

The Demise of George Armstrong Custer II

Lead: In 1868 the United States government arranged a treaty with a loose plains tribal confederation of various clans known as the Sioux.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: This treaty set aside a huge tract of land in what is now western South Da-kota. This was reserved to them for all time, but gold had been discovered in the Black Hills Mountain Range of the Dakotas and Wyoming in 1874 and the resulting flood of miners and ranchers into the Sioux reservation created substantial tension. The Indians resented the white presence and often were not shy in reprisal.

The Demise of George Armstrong Custer I

Lead: The death of George Armstrong Custer and his men was rooted in a fundamental disagreement about the way people should live.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Beginning in the early 1800s the youthful United States began to formulate a policy toward its Indian population. Few stopped to consider the opinions of Native Amer-icans who had lived on the North American continent for centuries. The solution was to push these aboriginal tribes west, across the Mississippi to mix with their western cousins, leaving white civilization in peace.

Daniel Boone in Boonesborough III

Lead: Facing a large scale Shawnee/British attack, Daniel Boone led the defense of Boonesborough, Kentucky. His leadership was under attack: many of the settlers thought him a traitor.
Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.
Content: Founded in 1775, the settlement of Boonesborough became a target for various Indian tribes angry at white intrusion into their territory and allied with the British. During an expedition to gather salt for the besieged outpost Boone was captured by a Shawnee raiding party and taken to their homes on the Miami River in south central Ohio. During four months of capture he convinced the Indians, the British, and at least a few of his fellow captives that he was switching sides. This conviction seemed to be confirmed when Blackfish, a Shawnee Chief, adopted Boone into his own family. Hearing of a coming campaign against the central Kentucky settlements, Boone escaped and made his way back to warn the pioneers. 

Read more →

Daniel Boone in Boonesborough II

Lead: The Shawnee Nation was divided. Some wished to live with American settlers, others allied with the British wanted to exterminate the growing flood of western pioneers.
Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.
Content: The American Revolution was an important phase in the struggle between Native Americans and settlers for control of the Ohio Valley. When Daniel Boone led a group across the mountains to establish the community of Boonesborough on the Kentucky River in 1775, he and his friends found themselves in the middle of that fight. Later in life he spoke with unusual frankness, "We Virginians waged a war of intrusion upon the Indians, pursuing them as I now would follow the tracks of a ravenous animal." Small wonder the western tribes felt themselves under pressure. The remarkable thing is that many of them wished to reach peaceful accommodation with the intruders. 

Read more →