The Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute II

Lead: The Hopi-Navajo land dispute derives much of its intensity because it is wrapped up in issues of energy independence, resource exploitation, and environmental annihilation.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After centuries of peaceful cohabitation, the arrival of white civilization pushed the Hopi and Navajo tribes into close proximity in the Four Corners region of northeast Arizona. What would be a normal intertribal dispute caused by the crowding, has been vastly complicated because their individual and shared lands sit on top of enormous energy resources, particularly coal.

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The Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute I

Lead: The Navajo-Hopi land dispute involves an excruciatingly complex mix of tradition, religion, economic exploitation, scarce energy resources, and environmental devastation.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the American Southwest, the states of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah come together at a precise point in the middle of the desert. The region surrounding that point is known as the Four Corners. This is the home of two Native American tribal groupings, the Hopi and the Navajo.

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The Seminole Indians – Part II

Lead: Between 1817 and 1858 the United States government prosecuted three costly wars in Florida against the Seminole Indians. The first of those wars launched the presidential career of Andrew Jackson.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1817 the United States government pursued a policy to aggressively open territory for white homesteaders. As settlers from Georgia moved south into Florida, then Spanish territory occupied by Seminole Indians, hostilities between the Seminoles and settlers provoked first Seminole War (1817-1818). Troops led by General Andrew Jackson defeated the Seminoles, and the clans fled south, deeper into Florida. In 1821 the U.S. acquired Florida from Spain, and fearing a powerful new American government, the Seminoles under treaty surrendered their tribal lands in northern Florida, moved reserved land in central Florida, and accepted in good promises of the U.S. government for protection.

 

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The Seminole Indians – Part I

Lead: In 1817 the dramatic Seminole struggle for survival began. It was the first of three wars the U.S. fought to bring them to heel.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Seminole Indians were not native to Florida. They were a clan of Creek nation who lived in what is Georgia and Alabama. English settlers called them “Creeks” because they inhabited the banks of rivers and streams in the southeastern America. During the early 1700s, in search of fertile ground, to avoid other tribal groups and a desire to escape the conflict with the ever-increasing tide of Europeans some of the Creeks, called the “lower Creeks” (because they lived furthest south), moved into northern Florida, which was then Spanish territory. This group of Creeks, and other Native Americans living in this region, soon became known as the Seminoles, “runaways” perhaps a corruption of the Spanish word Cimarron, meaning “wild” or “runaway.”

 

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Jamestown Journey: Bacon’s Rebellion II

Lead: In July 1675 a raid by Doeg Indians on the outlying Northern Neck plantation of Thomas Matthews laid the foundation for Bacon’s Rebellion.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: Matthews owed the Doeg payment for past dealings and during the raid the Indians stole several hogs as payback. Matthews’ counter-attack resulted in several deaths on both sides including that of his son.

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Battle of Wounded Knee II

Lead: The last major action in the Indian Wars was a major mistake, a culmination of fear, frustration, misunderstanding and false assumptions.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The massacre at Wounded Knee Creek in late December 1890 happened resulted from a religious revival among certain clans of the Sioux Confederation and a long-running dispute between the Indian Bureau, part of the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Army.

 

 

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Battle of Wounded Knee I

Lead: The last major armed conflict between whites and Native Americans ended on December 29, 1890 along Wounded Knee creek.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the cold early morning hours of December 29, 1890 elements of 7th and 9th United States Cavalry surrounded approximately 350 Miniconjous Sioux led by Big Foot camped at Wounded Knee twenty miles from the Pine Ridge Indian reservation in southwestern South Dakota. Within a brief time over 150 Sioux had been killed with another 44 wounded about half were women and children. More would later die of exposure. Army casualties were not small. Over 60 troopers were wounded or killed. In retrospect, such a high sacrifice of life on both sides made little sense. It resulted from broken promises, emotional despair, faulty expectations, professional ineptitude, and bureaucratic infighting.

 

 

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Dispute Over Origin of Thanksgiving

Lead: For generations the annual celebration of the Thanksgiving was assumed by most to have originated at the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts. The reality is a bit more complex.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In his 1963 Thanksgiving proclamation, President John F. Kennedy reminded the nation that “our forefathers in Virginia and in Massachusetts…far from home in a lonely wilderness, set aside a time of Thanksgiving.” If they heard about it, most Americans, indeed most Virginians, had no idea what he was talking about.

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