Britain Under Siege I

Lead:  On September 3, 1939 Britain found itself at war with Germany for the second time in a quarter century. Because of air power the frontlines of war were no long far from the homefront.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The first air-raid sirens sounded in London twenty-seven minutes after the announcement of war. It turned out to be a false alarm, a French aircraft accidentally wandered into British air space, but it was omen for the future. For the next six years, the home front was the front line. In the twentieth century, no longer would civilians be spared the direct experience of war. Mothers and their sons fought on battlefields of other’s devising.

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Santa Anna II

Lead: On April 21, 1836 the surprise defeat of Santa Anna by Sam Houston at San Jacinto assured the independence of Texas.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In early 1836 Mexico’s president and military general Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna marched his army into Texas, then part of Mexico, to quell a rebellion of settlers who were fighting for Texas’ independence. At the Alamo Santa Anna issued a “take no prisoners” order and word of the resulting massacre began to spread. 1,400 new volunteers swelled the ranks of Sam Houston’s rag-tag army. Through artful maneuvering, Houston was able to avoid direct confrontation while he built and trained his men in anticipation of the showdown with Santa Anna.

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Santa Anna I

Lead: In February 1836, Mexican troops, led by General Santa Anna, surrounded, attacked, defeated and killed a group of rebellious Texans at the Alamo.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna was born in Jalapa, Mexico, in 1794. He began a long and controversial military career at the age of 16 gaining prestige when he led Mexican resistance to Spain’s 1829 attempt at re-conquering the country. Four years later he was elected President. Gaining a reputation as an erratic leader, he then led a coup against his own government and established himself as dictator. The colorful, flamboyant Santa Anna loved glory, luxury, ceremony, beautiful women and opium. Not necessarily in that order.

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Rebirth of the Kee Bird

Lead: When Darryl Greenamyer attempted to resurrect the, Kee Bird, an ice-bound B-29 Stratofortress, he tested the limits of renovation technology. 

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1947, the Kee Bird, a U.S. Air Force B-29 bomber was flying across the frozen wastes of Greenland on a secret reconnaissance mission. The aircraft became lost, ran low on fuel and crash-landed. The crew was rescued, but the bomber was left behind and entered the realm of legend. There it remained for five decades just beyond the horizon a subject ripe for rescue and as the year passed an increasingly lucrative target for salvage.

 

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The Last Full Measure – Lewis “Chesty” Puller

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: For Chesty Puller, the Marines were his life. In 37 years, through three wars, Caribbean interventions, and regular service, Puller earned a reputation as a gruff, demanding leader, who, nonetheless, held the best interests of his men close to his heart. He became the most decorated marine in Corps history, but it was at Guadalcanal and at the Chosin reservoir in North Korea that Puller attained iconic status.

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The Last Full Measure: Leathernecks

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: From dimmest memory US Marines have been called "leathernecks." Members of the Corps bear that designation with pride but the term actually began as one of derision. The history of the term goes back to the 1700s. In the Prussian military, officers wore a neck cloth made of silk, velvet or black ribbed leather.

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LFM: Stephen Decatur

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Among the most distinguished early U.S. Naval officers, Stephen Decatur displayed courage under fire and a political astuteness that, save for his death by duel, marked him for high office, perhaps even the highest.  Decatur was born in Maryland during the Revolution and educated at the University of Pennsylvania.  He first came to national attention during the War with Tripoli.  President Jefferson had ordered the U.S. warships into the Mediterranean to get at the pirates who were raiding U.S. ships from bases in the so-called Barbary states, Morocco, Algeria, Tunis, and Tripolitania.

 

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The Last Full Measure – Cu Chi Tunnels of Vietnam II

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time (is presented by the people of _________ and) is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: Captain Herbert Thornton only recruited volunteers into his elite unit. The bad air, booby traps, and the prospect of a horrible and bizarre death made the challenge of going down into the tunnels of Cu Chi, northwest of Saigon, and Vietnam in general, more than you could require of just anyone. They called themselves “Tunnel Rats” and took as their motto “Non Gratum Anus Rodentum” or in pidgeon latin “not worth a rat’s ass.” Thornton, the chemical officer of the First Infantry Division when it arrived in Vietnam in 1966 and one of the first to lead the group, thought the tunnel rats had a certain élan about them. He called them, “a sort of oddball hero.” “It takes a special kind of being. He’s got to have an inquisitive mind, a lot of guts, and a lot of real moxie into knowing what to touch and what not to touch to stay alive.”

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