Gambling Comes to Nevada

Lead: Mired in the Great Depression, to create jobs the state of Nevada legalized gambling.

Intro.: "A Moment In Time" with Dan Roberts.

 Content: Nevada was the last area of the continental United States to be explored by Europeans. In the early 1800s British and American fur traders crossed the territory and then returned to trap along the Humboldt River the late 1820s. After gold was discovered in California in 1848, thousands of people crossed Nevada on their way to the Pacific Coast. Acquired from Mexico by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, Nevada became a separate territory after a dazzling silver strike, the Comstock Lode, near Virginia City. The discovery brought thousands seeking a bonanza some of whom stayed and helped make Nevada a state in 1864.

 

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Texas Invades New Mexico

Lead: After independence the new Republic of Texas experienced some acute growing pains.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Texas won its independence from Mexico in 1836. The disaster of the Alamo was soon followed by the defeat of Mexican General Santa Anna at San Jacinto. Sam Houston's experience as Governor of Tennessee and popularity as the architect of Texas' victory carried him into the Presidency of the New Republic.

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Mexican Muralism

Lead: At the root of the explosion of graffiti on American public spaces was the revolutionary artistic movement known as Mexican Muralism.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Murals have been around since prehistoric times, but the modern genesis of the term in part originated with the Mexican "muralista" art movement. In the years following the Mexican revolution, during the 1920s and 1930s, native art, often with a powerful political message, began to decorate blank walls all over Mexico. Varying in quality, murals helped turn the cities into works of art. Muralists used open public spaces to call attention to a troubled society’s dreams, needs and hopes, revealing the need for social transformation. These murals could not be quickly eradicated, though the authorities tried. They were in-your-face, provocative, and demonstrated insistent demands by the artists for social justice.

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Santa Anna II

Lead: On April 21, 1836 the surprise defeat of Santa Anna by Sam Houston at San Jacinto assured the independence of Texas.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In early 1836 Mexico’s president and military general Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna marched his army into Texas, then part of Mexico, to quell a rebellion of settlers who were fighting for Texas’ independence. At the Alamo Santa Anna issued a “take no prisoners” order and word of the resulting massacre began to spread. 1,400 new volunteers swelled the ranks of Sam Houston’s rag-tag army. Through artful maneuvering, Houston was able to avoid direct confrontation while he built and trained his men in anticipation of the showdown with Santa Anna.

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Santa Anna I

Lead: In February 1836, Mexican troops, led by General Santa Anna, surrounded, attacked, defeated and killed a group of rebellious Texans at the Alamo.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna was born in Jalapa, Mexico, in 1794. He began a long and controversial military career at the age of 16 gaining prestige when he led Mexican resistance to Spain’s 1829 attempt at re-conquering the country. Four years later he was elected President. Gaining a reputation as an erratic leader, he then led a coup against his own government and established himself as dictator. The colorful, flamboyant Santa Anna loved glory, luxury, ceremony, beautiful women and opium. Not necessarily in that order.

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1968: Mexico City Olympics II

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control. 

Content:  The dreams and scheming of political and social activists world-wide calculated the rich opportunity of the Mexico City Summer Olympics in 1968. The Olympics had never been far from politics. Even the ancient games were, in fact, relatively peaceful competition in midst of a truce between rival and hostile Greek City-States. In 1936, the Nazis attempted to use the Berlin Games as a propaganda outreach for their regime.

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1968: Mexico City Olympics I

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: As the time for the quadrennial Olympiad drew near, Mexico, the host country, looked warily at the anticipated arrival of thousands of visitors. Upheaval was the name of the game. It was, after all, 1968. Mexico’s President and Army had brutally, finally, firmly crushed the student-led protests that had filled the streets of the Capital since mid-summer and were anxious to demonstrate that the Revolution had produced a miracle of social and economic progress.

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Mexico: Spanish Conquest and Rule

Lead:  For almost 300 years after 1521, Mexico was a colony of Spain and known as “La Nueva España” or New Spain.  It was the crown jewel in Spain’s holdings in the New World.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the Spanish conquered the Aztecs in 1521, Mexico grew to include most of present day Central America and the southwestern United States. The colonial period lasted until the revolt of 1810 – which was led by a priest, Miguel Hidalgo, known today as the father of Mexico’s independence.

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