The Lincoln and Grant Meeting

The climactic events leading to the collapse of the Confederacy began on April 1, 1865 when Union forces defeated the two divisions of General George Pickett at the Battle of Five Forks. Lee could no longer hold Petersburg or stop the Yankees from cutting the Southside railroad. It was time for a breakthrough and General Grant seized the moment in a series of coordinated attacks that broke the siege and put Union troops into Petersburg proper.
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Old Towne Petersburg – I

The expansion of Virginia into the colonial heartland began in earnest soon after the European settlements had been secured following years of bloody warfare with Native Americans in the 1620s and 1630s. That development soon reached the confluence of the Appomattox and James Rivers in the region south and west of modern- day Hopewell. Part of the military system of forts set up to guard this growing move westward was Fort Henry built on the south side of the falls of the Appomattox in 1645.
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A House Divided: (56) – Fleeting Myth of Southern Unionism – II

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the early months of 1861 seven states had clearly committed themselves to a course of disunion and the Confederacy, but hope that the upper South could resist the forces of secession was ripe in both North and South. This proved illusory because it was based on the ability of the country to avoid the use of force.

A House Divided: (55) – Fleeting Myth of Southern Unionism – I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the election of Abraham Lincoln, it seemed that the die was cast. The South would leave the United States and seek a future in a southern Confederacy. Yet, breaking the bonds of Union proved strangely difficult for many, particularly in the upper South. In early February 1861, several states met in Montgomery, Alabama to craft a new nation, but only seven slave states showed up, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Florida and Texas. Over the next several weeks it seemed possible to develop a strategy to keep the remaining seven from joining their fellow slave states in disunion.

A House Divided: (54) – Election of 1860 – IV

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: 1860. Four parties. Four candidates. Southern democrats nominated John Cabell Breckinridge and carried most of the states in the south. Breckinridge may have sucked enough votes away from the regular Democrats to give the Republicans pluralities in California and Oregon.

A House Divided: (53) – Election of 1860 – III

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In an earlier era little known U.S. presidential candidates who emerged with little obvious support or chances for success were often called “dark horse” candidates. It is an old horse-racing term coined to describe a horse unknown to gamblers who have trouble laying odds on the horse’s potential performance. Abraham Lincoln was one such dark horse. Of those contending for the Republican nomination in 1860, Lincoln was relatively unknown, but had fewer weaknesses.

A House Divided: Slave or Free Labor I

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the most intense debates in the 1850s run-up to the Civil War involved the contrasting value of slavery and slave labor as opposed to free labor. Southerners attempted to justify their peculiar institution by asserting that slavery was good for the slave, the general economy and for society. One of the most aggressive proponents of this view was George Fitzhugh, scion of an ancient Virginia family that had fallen on hard times. His writings asserted that slavery was the normal circumstance of the human condition. Free labor, as practiced in the North, was a kind collective cannibalism.

A House Divided: Lincoln vs. Douglas on Slavery III

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content:  In their Senatorial debates in 1858, Democratic incumbent Stephen A. Douglas knew how to exploit the prejudice of whites and that it was a winning tactic. To great applause he asserted that Negroes should always be kept in subjugation. They were inferior. Lincoln’s insistence that blacks had a claim to the ‘created equality’ of the founders was a “monstrous heresy.” Did Jefferson really mean to say in his Declaration that his black slaves were actually entitled to parity in Divine law? Or that the great Virginian was in daily violation of God’s law by holding men and women in bondage.