Butte Mining Disaster II

Lead: Late in the evening of June 8, 1917, a fire began in a Butte Montana mine. Scores died, there was union unrest. It was the worst rock mining disaster in United States history.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The mine called Granite Mountain Mine in Butte, was known as the “richest mountain in the world.” Butte was the leading copper producer in the U.S., and 15,000 miners were working in shifts around the clock to meet the demand for copper during WWI.

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Butte Mining Disaster I

Lead: During World War I, copper deposits near Butte, 5700 feet above sea level in southwestern Montana made it the “richest hill on earth at the time.” Disaster struck in 1917.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Butte, Montana is situated on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains. Rich in mineral deposits, the Butte area filled mining camps for gold and silver during the 1860s and 1870s. With the advent of electric power, the demand for copper (a metal used for conduction of electricity), mushroomed, and with the arrival of the railroad lines, Butte became very prosperous. By the turn of the century, Butte was the leading producer of copper in the United States.

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Ernest Bevin: British Labor Leader

Lead: Ernest Bevin had a remarkable technique for conciliation. It led him from the docks of Bristol, England to the post of Foreign Secretary.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Bevin was born the illegitimate son of a village mid-wife, which in Victorian England was not a sign of future national leadership. Orphaned at the age of eight, Bevin became a farmhand by the time he turned eleven. He never took a liking for farmwork and soon migrated to Bristol where he became to deliver mineral water in 1901. In the wake of a Dock Workers Strike in 1910 Bevin was drawn into the labor movement and soon became a union recruiter.

 

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