Charlie Crocker’s $10K Bet (Transatlantic Railroad)

Lead: Charlie Crocker's men lay ten miles of track and won for their boss a $10,000 bet.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: It all started in late October 1868. Thomas C. Durant, of the Union Pacific Railroad, had just witnessed his own men laying 7 3/4 miles of track, a record for a single day's work. He then cabled Charlie Crocker, chief engineer of the Central Pacific working eastward on the first continental rail link. He wagered $10,000 that the Union Pacific's record could not be broken surpassed. Crocker thought he could beat it, accepted the bet, and bragged that his crew could lay ten miles of track in a single day.

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Henry Ford and the $5 Workday II

​Lead: Faced with declining productivity Henry Ford stumbled upon a novel solution, he improved the working conditions of his workers.
Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.
Content: In 1914, despite a new factory, numerous new machines and carefully planned efficiency programs, the Ford still had problem with turnover. The pay was low and working conditions were less than ideal. Men had little incentive to remain on the job and would float from job to job. Over that year for each 100 jobs in the plant, 963 men had to be hired.

Henry Ford and the $5 Workday

Lead: Henry Ford had a sparkling new factory to make his automobiles, he had perfected the assembly line to assemble them but there was one thing missing.
Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.
Content: In his old factory Henry Ford had been able to produce 14.7 cars a year per worker, therefore was shocked to discover that with the new plant in Highland Park, occupied in 1910, that his productivity had been cut more than in half to 6.7 car a year.

Teflon

Lead: In the history of industrial innovation, often the most profound discoveries come as accidents. Such was certainly the case with Teflon.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the years before they were considered by many to be harmful to the environment, chlorofluorocarbons, (CFCs) often known as Freon, brought a safe, efficient means of refrigeration into commercial and household use. Development of Freons emerged from a joint venture between the Frigidaire division of General Motors and the DuPont Chemical Company. Work with Freons led to the accidental discovery of Teflon. In spring 1938, two DuPont chemists were working with a promising new refrigerant, tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) combined with hydrochloric acid. As a convenience the TFE was stored in pressurized cylinders packed in dry ice. On the morning of April 6th, the chemists discovered that the TFE would not come out. When the cylinders were sawed open the interior walls were lined with a smooth, white, waxy substance. Something in the pressure and low temperature had caused the TFE to polymerize or solidify.

 

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J.P. Morgan and U.S. Steel – II  

Lead: In 1901 financier J. P. Morgan negotiated the “deal of the century,” the formation of U. S. Steel, the world’s first billion dollar corporation.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content:  By the turn of the last century, John Pierpont Morgan had become one of the world’s dominant financial figures by successfully financing and consolidating U.S. industries. During the 1880s he had concentrated primarily on railroad mergers. By the turn of the century seven of the major railroad lines controlled two thirds of the trackage. Morgan himself owned one of them.

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J.P. Morgan and U.S. Steel – I  

Lead: At his peak at the turn of the twentieth century, American financier J. P. Morgan was one of the most powerful financial figures in U.S. history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: John Pierpont Morgan was born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1837. Unlike his contemporaries, John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie, Morgan did not have humble beginnings. The son of an international banker, he was educated in the United States, Switzerland, and Germany, and he cultivated a high appreciation for art and music at an early age.

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