Barons of the Brandywine

Lead: After 93 days wandering on the high seas, one of America's greatest families arrived in Rhode Island.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: January 1, 1800, cold and wintery Newport, Rhode Island witnessed the arrival of the American Eagle. Its tall sails were torn and the sides covered with barnacle from its three months at sea. If anyone had bothered to look at that battered ship, hustling into the harbor that night, they would have noticed it bore an unusually flag, that of the family of Pierre Samuel DuPont de Nemours. They were lucky to be there. The DuPont family had come to prominence in the service of the royal family of France. Caught in the shifting alliances of the Revolution, Pierre and his sons remained very conservative and despite occasional flirtations with republicanism, found themselves on the wrong side of the disputes that led to Napoleon's rise to power. Released from prison, they had to promise to leave France.

 

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Fuel Crisis, 1918 – Part II

Lead:  Coal, coal everywhere and not a bit to burn. That was the frigid winter of 1918.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After decades of struggle the coal industry was finally coming into its own. The demand created by the World War I in Europe was so great that coal operators could hardly keep up and the price went out of the roof, $5.00, up from the common price of $1.00 during most of the 1800s.  President Woodrow Wilson tried to bring the cost down by decree, but dropping the price meant that coal men would send their shipments to the best customers, not the general public.

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Fuel Crisis, 1918 – Part I

Lead:  During the winter of 1918 the United States found itself at war and in the grip of a great energy crisis. There was plenty of coal but people couldn't get it.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the 80 years before 1914, the American coal industry was a victim of its own success. Coal seemed just below the surface nearly everywhere coal men looked. The industry mushroomed and production jumped from 17 million tons in 1870 to over 400 million annual tons in 1914. This explosive growth created a buyer's market and very low prices became the order of the day. People usually could buy coal for a $1.00 a ton.

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