The Parthenon

Lead: Etched on the Athenian skyline, the Parthenon has been subjected to abuse by a succession of regimes, but throughout, even in ruin, it has retained a profound elemental dignity.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the formal cessation of hostilities between the city-states of Greece and their Persian antagonist in 449 BC, the citizens of Athens and their formidable leader, Pericles, returned to pursuits of peace. He wished to make Athens a center of culture and intellect and began with a comprehensive program of construction and refurbishment. Pericles’ first project was a magnificent new structure that would dominate the Acropolis, the magnificent Temple of Athena or Parthenos.

 

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The Battle of Salamis Part I

Lead: During the 5th century BCE the outcome of the Greco-Persian Wars shifted international power from the Persian Empire to the Greeks. The Battle of Salamis is often regarded as the turning point.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Greco-Persian Wars were a series of military conflicts between several Greek city-states and the Persian Empire lasting for two decades from 499 to 479 BCE. The naval Battle of Salamis fought in 480 was documented by the Greek historian, Herodotus and was considered by him to be decisive in determining the outcome

 

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Birth of Modern Olympics – II

Lead: There were several whose work led to the modern Olympic games, but the most prominent of the founders was a Frenchman, Baron Pierre de Coubertin. His persistence in the face of universal apathy brought the Olympics to re-birth.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: As a young man, Coubertin came under the allure of the victorian English public school system. The portal through which he examined it was a French translation of Tom Brown’s Schooldays. It was romping fictional account of life at Rugby School in the 1830s by the school’s innovative headmaster, Thomas Hughes. Coubertin became a life-long devotee of the English emphasis on sport as an integral part of character development and an important part of basic education as a civilizing influence.

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Birth of Modern Olympics – I

Lead: Born of optimism about the human spirit and steeped in nineteenth century ideals of progress, the modern Olympics were designed to promote international good will, healthy living and peace. It did not always work out that way.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Ever since Coro ‘ebus, a young El’ean cook, prevailed in the 200 meter dash in 776 B.C., the Olympic games have been a source of inspiration and controversy. For more than a thousand years, each quadrennial, spectators and athletes, fans and opportunists would make the uncomfortable summer journey to the shrine of the god Zeus for the games. They were held on the Olympian plain in the northwest corner of Greece’s Peloponnesian peninsula.

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Leadership: Pericles and the Maturing of Athenian Democracy – II

Lead: Democracy is a rare thing. Even in ancient Athens, democrats constantly struggled to fend off tyrants and wealthy oligarchs seeking to terminate the rule of the people. One prominent ally of democracy in that struggle was the rhetorical genius of Pericles. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: The Athenian democratic constitution was never really secure. After the legislator Solon opened the ranks of citizenship and participation by rich and poor alike, his work was overthrown in 560 not to be revived until Cleisthenes reversed the tyranny in 508 and 507. His constitution but even that retained a large measure of aristocratic rule. Gradually, however, reforms chipped away at the power of the oligarchs and more and more of Athens citizens gained economic rights and those of participation in the ____, the Assembly of the People.

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Leadership: Pericles and the Maturing of Athenian Democracy – I

Lead: In the relatively short history of human civilization, democracy has only rarely emerged a way of doing public business. In ancient Greece, democracy emerged through the efforts of a group of aristocrats. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Democracy, the rule of the people is a rare and precious thing. Since the beginning of human government most people have been told how to live by monarchs, oligarchs or dictators. The human will to power is a commanding impulse and most leaders have aspired to power as absolute as they could achieve. In ancient Greece, from about 620 BC for more than two centuries, in fits and starts, the Greek city-state of Athens, gradually established the rule of the people. This change came as a result of the efforts of several important aristocrats, acting against their class and position society and in the name of the public good, help create an experiment in self-rule that would not be repeated for centuries.

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