The Trial and Execution of Socrates II

Lead: In 399 BC, Socrates, Greek teacher and philosopher, suspected of complicity in Athens’ defeat in the Peloponnesian War, was condemned to death by a jury of his peers.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the modern era, Socrates is regarded as one of the most influential figures in the development of thought and philosophy in the west. In the aftermath of the Peloponnesian War, in 399 BC, Socrates was viewed by some as an enemy of Athenian democracy. Socrates often criticized city officials for their lack of moral and intellectual leadership. In the aftermath of Athens’ defeat, charges were brought against the seventy year old teacher, charges of impiety (religious heresies) and corruption of the morals of the young men of Athens (unpatriotic agitation).

Read more →

The Trial and Execution of Socrates I

Lead: In 399 BC the Greek philosopher and social critic, Socrates, was tried for religious heresies and corrupting the morals of the young. His conviction led to his suicide.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Socrates, left no writings of his own. His life and philosophy are known to us through the writings of Plato, his most famous pupil and follower, and through the Greek historian Xenophon. His ideas became the foundation for an secular ethical philosophy based on knowledge and self-examination. Through knowledge, Socrates maintained, one could learn justice, truth and love, and in their application lead a moral life. Socrates’ method of teaching his philosophy is now known as the “Socratic method”- a dialogue between teacher and student that promotes self-examination. The teacher begins with a question such as “What is courage?” The student responds and thus begins a series of interrogatives, question answer, further question, answer, and so on.

Read more →

The Parthenon

Lead: Etched on the Athenian skyline, the Parthenon has been subjected to abuse by a succession of regimes, but throughout, even in ruin, it has retained a profound elemental dignity.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the formal cessation of hostilities between the city-states of Greece and their Persian antagonist in 449 BC, the citizens of Athens and their formidable leader, Pericles, returned to pursuits of peace. He wished to make Athens a center of culture and intellect and began with a comprehensive program of construction and refurbishment. Pericles’ first project was a magnificent new structure that would dominate the Acropolis, the magnificent Temple of Athena or Parthenos.

 

Read more →

The Battle of Salamis Part I

Lead: During the 5th century BCE the outcome of the Greco-Persian Wars shifted international power from the Persian Empire to the Greeks. The Battle of Salamis is often regarded as the turning point.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Greco-Persian Wars were a series of military conflicts between several Greek city-states and the Persian Empire lasting for two decades from 499 to 479 BCE. The naval Battle of Salamis fought in 480 was documented by the Greek historian, Herodotus and was considered by him to be decisive in determining the outcome

 

Read more →

The Parthenon

Lead: Etched on the Athenian skyline, the Parthenon has been subjected to abuse by a succession of regimes, but throughout even in ruin has retained a profound elemental dignity.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the formal cessation of hostilities between the city-states of Greece and their Persian antagonist in 449 BC, the citizens of Athens and their formidable leader Pericles returned to pursuits of peace. He wished to make Athens a center of culture and intellect and began with a comprehensive program of construction and refurbishment. Pericles first project was a magnificent new structure that would dominate the Acropolis, the magnificent Temple of Athena Parthenos.

 

Read more →

Seven Wonders of the Ancient World: Statue of Zeus at Olympus

Lead: Intimately associated with the ancient Olympic games, the gold and ivory Statue of the chief Greek god Zeus was considered one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The early history of the games is shrouded in mystery and myth. One legend says they marked the ascension of Pelops, for whom the Greek Peloponnesus island system is named, to the throne of Pisa.  He achieved that distinction by defeating the prior king in a chariot race, or perhaps the games began at the funeral of some great dignitary, perhaps even Pelops. Whatever the cause, sometime around 776 BCE, athletes began regularly gathering for games, not at the home of the gods, Mount Olympus in Thessaly, but at Olympia on the western coast where Pelops was enshrined.

Read more →

Birth of Modern Olympics – II

Lead: There were several whose work led to the modern Olympic games, but the most prominent of the founders was a Frenchman, Baron Pierre de Coubertin. His persistence in the face of universal apathy brought the Olympics to re-birth.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: As a young man, Coubertin came under the allure of the victorian English public school system. The portal through which he examined it was a French translation of Tom Brown’s Schooldays. It was romping fictional account of life at Rugby School in the 1830s by the school’s innovative headmaster, Thomas Hughes. Coubertin became a life-long devotee of the English emphasis on sport as an integral part of character development and an important part of basic education as a civilizing influence.

Read more →

Birth of Modern Olympics – I

Lead: Born of optimism about the human spirit and steeped in nineteenth century ideals of progress, the modern Olympics were designed to promote international good will, healthy living and peace. It did not always work out that way.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Ever since Coro ‘ebus, a young El’ean cook, prevailed in the 200 meter dash in 776 B.C., the Olympic games have been a source of inspiration and controversy. For more than a thousand years, each quadrennial, spectators and athletes, fans and opportunists would make the uncomfortable summer journey to the shrine of the god Zeus for the games. They were held on the Olympian plain in the northwest corner of Greece’s Peloponnesian peninsula.

Read more →