A House Divided (26): Slave Fugitives – Shadrach – II

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the 1850s Southerners, aided by the Federal government, became more aggressive in their quite legal pursuit of escaped slave property under the Fugitive Slave Law. Northern confrontation became more pronounced. Nowhere was this opposition more intense than Massachusetts. James B. McPherson called Boston, “the cockpit of this new revolution,” of resistance. In early 1851 a freshly escaped black waiter, self-renamed Shadrach for protection, was grabbed by agents in a Boston coffeehouse.

A House Divided (27): Slave Fugitives III – Sims


Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the years following the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law in 1850, Boston established a reputation as a sanctuary for escapees and the abolitionist community stalwart defenders of their rights. As southerners became more, forceful Boston became more belligerent, showing hostility to slave catchers, hiding ex-slaves and being emphatically uncooperative with legal efforts to enforce the law.

A House Divided (25): Slave Fugitives -Battle of Christiana–I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: “The only way to make the Fugitive Slave Law a dead letter, said African American leader Frederick Douglass, “is to make half a dozen or more dead kidnappers.” Nothing was more illustrative of the deteriorating national situation in the 1850s than the poisonous circumstances surrounding fugitive slaves and the federal assistance demanded by the South in its securing human property. The greater the success the South had, the more vigorous was the resistance in the north. It did not take long after the 1850 law went into effect that it was dipped in blood.