Belle Huntington II

Lead: Born of humble circumstances in Richmond, Arabella Yarrington Huntington in 1900 was considered by many to be the richest woman in the world.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After helping to build the first transcontinental railroad, Collis Potter Huntington went south to explore investment opportunities. During his stays at a Richmond, Virginia boardinghouse, he fell in love with the daughter of the owner who also served as barmaid, Arabella. She was thirty years his junior but a vivacious and beautiful woman. She moved to New York, became his mistress, and bore him a son in 1870.

Belle Huntington I

Lead: One of America's foremost collectors of art as an adult expended great energy concealing her roots. Belle Huntington spent her youth as a barmaid in Shockoe Bottom.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Collis Potter Huntington was one of the founders of the Central Pacific, the West Coast link of the first Transcontinental Railroad. With the completion of that line in 1869, Huntington began to seek other outlets for his restless energy. One logical place to search was the South. Defeated and demoralized, Southerners were anxious to attract capital investment to help rebuild the region in the years following the Civil War. In 1868 Huntington came to Richmond, Virginia seeking to merge three ailing Virginia railroads into an effective southeastern network that could feed into his transcontinental lines. He secured an endorsement for the merger from Robert E. Lee and in 1870 he reorganized the Chesapeake and Ohio with himself as President..

Samuel Johnson and Patronage

Lead:  In Samuel’s Johnson’s Dictionary of the English Language, he defines a patron: One who countenances, supports or protects. Commonly a wretch who supports with insolence, and is paid with flattery.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Eighteenth-century London was a magnet for aspiring writers like Samuel Johnson. He came to London from the midlands in 1737, penniless, ill-fed, and ill-clothed. He contributed to periodicals for a number of years, barely getting by, and after many years of obscurity, secured his reputation as a man of letters with the publication of his Dictionary of the English Language in 1755. For that accomplishment he was awarded a modest annual pension from the British government, and thus gained financial independence.

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Samuel Johnson: Alleviating Poverty

Lead:  Samuel Johnson, like many of his contemporary British writers, struggled with poverty while establishing his career. He later wrote of those years with a mixture of warning and compassion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: “Resolve not to be poor: whatever you have, spend less. Poverty is a great enemy to human happiness; it certainly destroys liberty, and it makes some virtues impracticable, and others extremely difficult.”

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