Entente Cordiale – II

Lead: With their dominance of world affairs under challenge, long-term antagonists France and Britain in the 1850s gingerly began to explore the possibilities of alliance. This process was confirmed in 1904 in the Entente Cordiale.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

               

Content: Henry John Temple Palmerston was British Foreign Secretary for most of the period 1830-1851. He also served as Prime Minister in the 1850s. He was the first prominent politician to describe post-1830 Anglo-French relations as entente cordiale, as a warm understanding. In that year France had abandoned forever the old Bourbon monarchy and embarked on a stumbling course towards liberal democracy. Once that happened, Britain, with varying degrees of enthusiasm and not a little skepticism at times, moved toward a closer relationship France. This would not yield an official coalition until early in the next century but with the help of prominent leaders such as Palmerston and, ironically, French President and then Emperor Louis-Napoleon III, France and Britain moved slowly but surely in the direction of alliance. 

 

Entente Cordiale I

Lead: Relations between the French and the British were wary at best from the middle ages. They were antagonists until an even greater threat brought them together.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1066 William, Duke of Normandy, a province in Northwestern France, invaded southern England and defeated the Saxon ruling house at the Battle of Hastings. Gradually his henchmen supplanted the Saxon nobility and England was dominated by French rulers and directly embroiled in French affairs at least until the end of the Hundred Years War in the 1450s. As the centuries passed, these two great national states circled around each other with a wariness that bordered on antagonism, sometimes seeking détente, sometimes in open conflict.

 

 

 

 

The Valley of the Fallen

Lead: At his death in 1975, the remains of Francisco Franco were interred in a elaborate basilica carved from a mountain and topped with a 500 foot stone cross in El Valle de los Caidos, the Valley of the Fallen. It is an exquisite obscenity.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: In the 1940s Francisco Franco, Spain’s Head of State and leader of the victorious Nationalist insurgents in the bloody Spanish Civil War, like many tyrants before him, entered his Egyptian phase. He began to build his tomb. 

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Spanish Civil War (Francisco Franco) – III

Lead: Both during and after the Spanish Civil War, Francisco Franco led the nationalists. He and his allies were determined to halt Spain’s drift into the modern world, but they failed.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: In July, 1936 conservative generals led by Francisco Franco attempted a coup d’etat against the elected government of Spain’s Second Republic. Their goal was a quick and bloodless take-over using rebellious army units. To their surprise the government did not roll over, but stood firm. The Spanish Civil War lasted for three years, produced horrendous casualties, and created tension divides Spanish society to this day.

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Spanish Civil War (Francisco Franco) – II

Lead: The driving force behind the nationalists in the Spanish Civil War was General Francisco Franco Bahamonde. He lived in the world of the past and devoted his life to keeping Spain there as well.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Franco was born in 1892. Spain at the time was conservative, Catholic, and nursed a waning, but powerful imperial memory. No longer the center of the world and soon to have Cuba and the Philippines, its two remaining colonial jewels, taken in the Spanish-American War, Spain needed to move quickly to exploit its rich natural, political and human resources, but it did not. That Spain would be denied its rightful place in the ranks of modern, democratic, and progressive societies until the 1970s, was in good measure the result of the life work of Francisco Franco.

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