Mata Hari II

Lead: Abandoned, left to her own devices and temptations, Margaretha MacLeod in the years before World War I, transformed herself into Mata Hari, erotic entertainer, suspected spy, seductress extraordinaire.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Margaretha Zelle MacLeod married an abusive, womanizing and alcoholic Dutch army officer and for a time they lived in baronial splendor as appropriate to colonial officials in the East Indies. In 1899, after the poisoning death of their son, probably by one of her husband’s native mistresses, the couple was divorced and a penniless Margaretha returned to Europe. By 1905 in Paris she had transformed herself into Mata Hari, translated “Mother of God” in Sanskrit and “Eye of the Dawn” in Indonesian. Soon her erotic dance routine was the talk of the town and her excellent and expensive sexual services were in high demand, particularly by powerful military men. A whiz in languages from early years, she could whisper sweet nothings fluently in Dutch, English, German and French.

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Mata Hari I

Lead: During World War I, probably on trumped charges, the French arrested, tried, convicted and executed Mata Hari as a German spy. She was probably only guilty of a weakness for powerful men in uniforms.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Mati Hari was born Margaretha Geertruida Zelle in Leeuwarden (lee wadden) Netherlands in 1876. Despite her Dutch heritage, she was of exotic appearance with long rich black hair, olive complexion, and penetrating black eyes. From earliest days she was often the topic of rumor and gossip in the neighborhood.

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Berlin Spy Tunnel II

Lead:  In 1954 the Central Intelligence Agency dug a 1400 foot tunnel under the border of East Berlin to spy on Soviet military messages. It was an engineering triumph, but there was one hitch. The Soviets knew it was there.

Tag: "A Moment In Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: George Blake was a member of the British Secret Intelligence Service. During the early days of the Korean War he was captured by the North Koreans and held for three years. Sometime during his prison stay he went over to the other side. In 1954, when the spy tunnel was first discussed by the CIA and its British counterpart, MI6, Blake was in the meeting, took extensive notes, and passed the sketches and drawings to his KGB control officer within two days.

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Berlin Spy Tunnel I

Lead:  In 1954, at the height of the Cold War, the CIA and British MI6 dug a tunnel under divided Berlin to spy on the Russians. They thought it was a secret.

 Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: The city of Berlin during the 1950s was divided east and west and was the focus of much tension between the Soviet Union and the western Allies.  It was also crawling with spies. One of those was the CIA's station chief in Berlin, William King Harvey. He received information that the Soviets had laid three telephone and telegraph cables 18 inches beneath the soil near the road to Shönefeld Airport. Over these lines the Soviet military command in Berlin communicated with Moscow. Building on the experience of the British who had conducted a similar but smaller operation against the Soviets in Vienna, Harvey convinced his bosses to construct a tunnel, intercept the cables and tap them.

 

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