The Unrequited Loves of Elizabeth I – II

Lead: When Elizabeth Tudor came to the throne of England in 1558, she had been abused and shoved around by men for most of her 25 years. For the first time, her life was truly in her own hands.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After she became Queen, Elizabeth wielded her sexuality and the prospect of the royal marriage as a weapon for political and dynastic purposes. She did not hesitate to dangle her hand before eligible European royalty as well as home-grown aristocrats. The purpose, of course, was to secure safety for the kingdom against threats from the outside and flexibility for herself in governing England.

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The Unrequited Loves of Elizabeth I – I

Lead: When Elizabeth Tudor came to the throne of England in 1558, she had been abused and shoved around by men for most of her 25 years. For the first time, her life was truly in her own hands.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After she became Queen, Elizabeth wielded her sexuality and the prospect of the royal marriage as a weapon for political and dynastic purposes. She did not hesitate to dangle her hand before eligible European royalty as well as home-grown aristocrats. The purpose, of course, was to secure safety for the kingdom against threats from the outside and flexibility for herself in governing England.

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Bad King John and the Great Charter – II

Lead: Pressed by enemies on all sides, England's King John comes to rough terms on the field at Runnymede.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In his sixteen year reign, beginning in 1199, John seemed to antagonize nearly every part of his Kingdom. The youngest son of powerful parents, Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, and successor to his popular rival and brother, the warrior King Richard, Lion Heart, John never captured the affection or support of the barons, his most powerful subjects. His policy of ruthless taxation, England's loss of vast territories in northern France and his running battle with Pope Innocent III over the appointment of church leaders further complicated an already troubled reign.

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Bad King John and the Great Charter – I

Lead: King John is usually listed as among the worst English monarchs. He came by such a reputation the hard way. He earned it.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: The youngest son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, John had a hard act to follow. His father was a world-class monarch with enormous holdings in England and on the Continent. His mother was a force of nature, having been the Queen of both France and England, the advisor and occasional adversary of husband and sons. John's brother was Richard I, known affectionately as Lion Heart, the popular warrior king whose sibling rivalry with John had consumed nearly all their adult lives. John became the ruler nearly everyone loved to hate and this included contemporary chroniclers and later many historians.

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John Locke – Prophet of Political Freedom – II

Lead:  His political philosophy laid the foundation for modern liberal democracy, but in many ways John Locke helped change the way people think. Some have called him the first modern mind.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Not content to simply absorb the classical education he received at 17th century Westminster School and Oxford University, John Locke embarked upon a life of fruitful inquiry into a wide variety of disciplines. He was interested in medicine, experimental science, philosophy, economics, practical politics, education, language, diplomacy, and religion, in a hungry but not Faustian pursuit of knowledge. In most of these fields he was not an expert, but neither was he an amateur floating from one whim to another.

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John Locke – Prophet of Political Freedom – I

Lead: Emerging from the political ferment of the English Civil War, John Locke, one of the seminal thinkers of the 17th century, laid the philosophical basis for liberal representative government.

 

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

Content: John Locke was born in 1632 in Pensford, south of Bristol, England. His father, a country attorney, was of puritan inclination and fought in the Civil War on the side of Parliament. This enabled him to send his son to Westminster School where the boy’s superior performance earned him a scholarship at Christ Church College, Oxford. There he also excelled, but found the traditional curriculum tedious and demonstrated early a lifelong eclectic interest in a wide variety of subjects such as empirical science and medicine.

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King John and the Great Charter – III

Lead: In the summer of 1215, rebellious barons of England forced their King to sign accept a reservation of rights popularly known as Magna Carta.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: King John has been one of the most despised of all English monarchs. His parents, Henry II and Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine and his brother Richard I, the Lion Heart, were powerful and popular rulers. John’s inheritance included much of provincial France, which he lost in a series of fumbled campaigns against the King of France. Oppressive taxation to support this warfare and a long-running dispute with Pope Innocent III over the appointment of church officials further eroded his support in England. By 1215 he had been the subject of at least one murder plot and the electricity of rebellion was sweeping the kingdom.

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The Trial of Charles I – III

Lead: The alliance of politics and religion proved a revolutionary formula for in England during the 1640s. For King Charles I it was deadly combination.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Estranged from many in his Kingdom, desperate for new sources of money, and caught in a war of his own making in Scotland, Charles Stuart, King of the English and the Scots was forced to call Parliament to meet, something he had put off for eleven years. When the members came to Westminster in the Spring of 1640 and then again in November, they forced upon Charles reforms which secured a permanent roll for Parliament in national affairs. They broke the power of two of the King's closest advisers, Archbishop William Laud and Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Strafford, eventually executing both.

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