Estee Lauder: Beauty Industry Innovator

Lead: The daughter of immigrants, Josephine Esther Mentzer, a.k.a. Estée Lauder set the industry standard for women’s beauty products in 20th Century America.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Esther grew up a borough girl in Queens, the ninth and last child of Max and Rose Mentzer. Early on she became fascinated with the creams and fragrances that her mother used and that her relatives sold in their stores. As a teenager she learned merchandizing and customer relations, caught up as she later wrote, “by pretty things and pretty people.” She learned early on from her Uncle John Schotz the benefits of hands-on selling demonstrating how products worked on the faces and hands of her customers.

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Christian Children’s Fund

Lead: From 1937 to 1940 as many as 2,000,000 Chinese children died of starvation in the wake of the Japanese invasion. Calvitt Clarke set out to do something about it.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: The twentieth century has borne witness to much progress in technology and at least in some fortunate parts of the world an advance in the standard of living, health and nutrition. But this era has also seen an unprecedented growth in suffering and bloodshed. The specter of total war has at times engulfed the entire world. No longer was the civilian population spared when armies were on the move. Predator governments turned first on their own people then on neighboring nations in what at times seemed to be an endless round of ethnic and ideological conflict.

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Malaysia II

Lead: Emerging from a post-colonial crisis in the 1960s, Malaysia is on track by the mid-21st century to be one of the world’s great economies.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After World War II, powerful Malaysian nationalist forces began pressing Britain to grant the archipelago its independence. Britain began the process, but beginning in 1948 mostly Chinese rebels led by the Malayan Communist Party conducted a bloody insurrection known as the Malayan Emergency. Commonwealth troops alongside Malayan nationals put down the rebellion, but it took a dozen years. With the end of the uprising Britain’s rule was over and a federated state was created which included Peninsula Malaysia, North Borneo, Sarawak and Singapore. Singapore departed in 1965 and the remaining government is a federal constitutionally elected monarchy made up of thirteen states and three federal territories. The capital and largest city is Kuala Lumpur though much of the federal administrative apparatus is located 25 kilometers south in the planned city of Putrajaya.

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Malaysia I

Lead: Assembled from various components of the British Empire, the nation of Malaysia has made great strides since achieving independence.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Malaysia occupies the severe southeastern point of the Eurasian continent and lies athwart some of the richest, most traveled shipping lanes in the world. The indigenous Malay population was supplemented through commercial connections with Indian and Chinese traders sometime around the first century CE. The result is that just over 20% of the population of 30,000,000 is of ethnic Chinese descent. Hinduism and Buddhism were adopted by the native population until the arrival of Islam in the 1300s and today, with Muslims constituting around 60% of the population, Islam is the official faith of Malaysia, though freedom of religion is a constitutionally protected right.

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British Financial Troubles III (American Revolution)

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Faced with a major financial crisis at the end of the Seven Years War in 1763 and a populace restive over high taxation to pay for a huge national debt, the British Parliament began to cast around for other sources of income. One likely and potentially rich trove of revenue might be found in the 13 colonies of North America. The white people there were among the richest people in the world and, compared to homebound Englishmen, on average enjoyed a higher standard of living and a level of taxation that could only be called light.

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British Financial Troubles II (American Revolution)

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Despite deep-seated opposition to permanent military forces, after the Glorious Revolution in 1688 England acquired a ruling King, a Dutchman, William of Orange, husband of Mary Stuart. The foreign policy of William and Mary therefore primarily involved protecting Holland from the forces of French King Louis XIV, and interdicting French military ambitions elsewhere in Europe and the world. This power projection required much more than a small militia charged with constabulary duties in the cities and counties of England. It required a large standing Army and the maintenance of a major Navy. There were three wars with the French: 1688-1697, 1702-1713, and 1736-1763. This series of conflicts cost a lot of money and by the end of War of Spanish Succession in 1713, the primary source of governmental revenue theretofore, a tax on land, just wasn’t enough.

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British Financial Troubles I (American Revolution)

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In the years following the English Civil Wars in the 1640s and the Puritan governmental experiments in the 1650s, no sentiment was more firmly entrenched in the mindset of the English people than was the determination that there would be “no standing armies.” Two decades of having the government able to dictate religious, social, and political behavior at the point of the sword set English teeth on edge.

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Peasants Revolt (1381)

Lead: In 1381 England was the scene of the largest peasant uprising in Europe during the Middle Ages.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: For three decades prior to 1380 Europe was decimated by the Black Death. Perhaps third of the population simply disappeared. One of the results of this plague was a reduction in the number of laborers available for work. Suddenly, peasants found themselves able to sell their services at a much higher rate.

Landowners and merchants resisted this wage inflation with every weapon at their disposal. They failed miserably. The price for labor climbed higher and higher. And the better off the peasants became, the higher were their expectations. Soon they were demanding social changes the upper classes were not willing to give. All that was needed was a spark to set off an explosion. It came in 1380.

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