The Making of Santa Claus I

Lead:  One of the most beloved legendary figures of the western world is Santa Claus. His legend originated in 4th century southwest Asia Minor, which is present day Turkey.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The tradition of Santa Claus has its genesis in various customs of different cultures throughout the world. However, the great influence came from a real person - a young monk named Nicholas who served as a priest and later as a bishop in the town of Myra, on the Mediterranean seacoast.

Read more →

Enlightenment III

Lead: Intellectual movements seize upon innovative communications to spread their ideas. The European Enlightenment used the London coffeehouse, the Parisian salon and a giant set of books. The results were revolutionary.

Content: In the late 20th century American movement conservatives used talk radio to emerge from the political wilderness. Reeling from defeat, their progressive opponents seized upon the Internet to restore their fortunes. The cheerleaders of the Enlightenment, journalists and writers in England and the French philosophes were eager to advance their ideas so as to reform the role of government and religion. Their goal was to secure political liberty, economic freedom and expanded education for the masses. The means they used varied in place and time.

 

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [102.94 KB]

Enlightenment II

Lead: In a supreme irony, the great figures who graced the French Enlightenment were not particularly original thinkers, rather they were the ones who popularized and championed the new and radical ideas of that era.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Philosophe is the French word for philosopher, and the term is used almost exclusively in English to refer to those important figures of the French Enlightenment. Yet, these philosophes, brilliant of intellect and articulate of word, merely passed on in a most elegant and passionate way the ideas created elsewhere. They were the cheerleaders, the intellectual journalists, the summarizers, the popularizers that gave wings and prominence to the themes of liberty, equality, revolutionary science, economic freedom and the primacy of human reason that characterized the movement. The followers of the philosophes were well educated – mostly from the French elite and aristocracy. Their new ideas were considered chic and exciting.

 

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [107.74 KB]

Enlightenment I

Lead: The philosophical underpinning - independence, individual rights, liberty, equality, and economic freedom - of both the French and American Revolutions emerged from the European Enlightenment.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At the heart of the Enlightenment was the absolute confidence in human reason and the conviction that men and women had the capacity to master their environment. As a result, out of this period, there emerged significant reforms in government, religion and education rooted in the human desire to change the world.

 

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [103.48 KB]

Phi Beta Kappa, The First Fraternity

Lead: Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest Greek letter American college fraternity, was founded in 1776 on the principles of social brotherhood and intellectual curiosity, but not drinking.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Although student associations and guilds existed in European Universities for hundreds of years, American students founded Greek letter fraternities. The first of these, Phi Beta Kappa, was spearheaded by fifteen year old John Heath, a student at the College of William and Mary. He and other students held regular meetings for four years – with the anniversary meeting held at the Raleigh Tavern, the site of the first gathering.

 

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download [106.06 KB]