Mexico: Monarch Butterfly

Lead: Monarch butterflies are strikingly beautiful, with brilliant orange and black wings, but it is their migration habits over thousands of miles that distinguish this remarkable species.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Each winter, the Oyamel tree forest in central Mexico becomes home to millions of hibernating monarch butterflies. The trees there are large, coniferous and grow at a high altitude. In February/March the hibernating Monarchs come down from the mountains and begin their flight north. In fields and meadows along the way, they lay their eggs on the underside of the leaves of milkweed plants. It takes about a month for an egg to complete four stages of development and become a mature adult. During the caterpillar stage, the Monarch feeds on the milkweed, absorbs certain toxins and this makes them poisonous to predators. This first generation of Monarch butterflies will live for about three to six weeks and continue the northern migration.

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The Algonquin Roundtable – II

Lead: The years that followed World War I were optimistic and happy times, a new era of creativity in culture and letters. Leading the way were the members of the Algonquin Roundtable.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: They changed the face of American humor. “A hard-bitten crew,” said Edna Ferber, author of Giant, of her fellows at the Roundtable which met daily for lunch at the Algonquin Hotel in New York, “but if they liked your work they said so publicly and whole-heartedly.” They were fluent, fresh, acerbic, and tough. And could they make you laugh. Ferber insisted that, “being an old maid is like death by drowning, a really delightful sensation, after you cease to struggle.”

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The Algonquin Roundtable – I

Lead: In the years following World War I, a group of future literary stars began to meet for lunch at the fabled Algonquin Hotel in New York.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: World War I helped transform society, culture, religion, manners and literary standards into what became the modern era. In America, New York was the center of this transforming spirit and for a decade in the 1920s driving this revolution in thought and energy was the Algonquin Roundtable or as one author has described them, “the vicious circle.” This informal lunch gathering got its start when writers John Peter Toohey and Dorothy Parker and columnist Franklin Pierce Adams organized a celebration and lampooning of the wartime service of their friend Alexander Woollcott, critic for the New York Times. He was so enthusiastic about his his service, that the duty of friendship required them to shut him up. The Algonquin, just off Broadway on Forty-fourth Street, was already a prestigious gathering place for actors and the literary set so it was a logical place for the event. When he found their friendly sarcasm hugely amusing, one of their number suggested that they meet daily for lunch and a historic tradition commenced.

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History’s Turning Points: The End of Chastity II

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. Consider one of history’s turning points – conspirators in the death of chastity.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In his 1960 novel Where the Boys Are, Clendon Swarthout mused that “virginity was not all that important…nor do I think a girl’s misplacing it somewhere is as catastrophic as the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.” Perhaps not, but for thousands of years prior, chastity was very important, for families, for religious institutions, for dynastic security. Men might not have to maintain theirs, a classic double standard, but much energy was expended to make sure that females were chaste. Yet, within just a few short decades, it just went away, something considered so precious in previous generations was abandoned with a near careless lack of restraint.

History’s Turning Points: The End of Chastity I

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. Consider one of history’s great social turning points – the death of chastity.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The expectation that a woman had to remain chaste, a virgin, until marriage or at least until engagement, had been around for millennia. The purpose of sex had been to make babies, propagate the species, extend the family, and in that process women were seen to play the essential role, the depository of the seed of life. It was thought that female chastity was essential. That the other half of the population, the male half, was not expected to maintain quite the same level of virtuous existence became increasingly seen as a double-standard in the modern era. Suddenly women had an ally, a tiny chemical wafer – the Pill - that helped redress an ancient gender imbalance. Now the act of sex could be severed from procreation. The rules governing chastity were being repealed. The invention and wide availability of the Pill sat upon one of history’s great turning points.

History’s Turning Points: The End of Chastity II

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. Consider one of history’s turning points – conspirators in the death of chastity.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In his 1960 novel Where the Boys Are, Clendon Swarthout mused that “virginity was not all that important…nor do I think a girl’s misplacing it somewhere is as catastrophic as the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.” Perhaps not, but for thousands of years prior, chastity was very important, for families, for religious institutions, for dynastic security. Men might not have to maintain theirs, a classic double standard, but much energy was expended to make sure that females were chaste. Yet, within just a few short decades, it just went away, something considered so precious in previous generations was abandoned with a near careless lack of restraint.

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History’s Turning Points: The End of Chastity I

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. Consider one of history’s great social turning points – the death of chastity.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The expectation that a woman had to remain chaste, a virgin, until marriage or at least until engagement, had been around for millennia. The purpose of sex had been to make babies, propagate the species, extend the family, and in that process women were seen to play the essential role, the depository of the seed of life. It was thought that female chastity was essential. That the other half of the population, the male half, was not expected to maintain quite the same level of virtuous existence became increasingly seen as a double-standard in the modern era. Suddenly women had an ally, a tiny chemical wafer – the Pill - that helped redress an ancient gender imbalance. Now the act of sex could be severed from procreation. The rules governing chastity were being repealed. The invention and wide availability of the Pill sat upon one of history’s great turning points.

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Bonnie and Clyde II

Lead: On May 23, 1934, the law finally caught Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. The long ride and the acclaim came to an end.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At the time of their deaths, the pair, known popularly as “Bonnie and Clyde,” were a legend in the depression era. Americans were appalled, yet fascinated by the crime spree, the narrow escapes, and the embarrassment the two were causing the law enforcement establishment. For over two years. Bonnie even sent terrible poems and tacky pictures to the press. Many were actually published in national newspapers, thus creating a pair of celebrity outlaws.

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