Armed Forces Radio II

Lead: During World War II the British Broadcasting Corporation and the American Forces Radio (AFN) had to be forced to work together in support of the Normandy invasion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Required to give up its monopoly on radio broadcasting in Britain during World War II, the BBC welcomed the fledgling GI network with surprising grace considering its previous opposition. BBC helped AFN with studios, engineering assistance and expertise, but it was not easy. The Brits strove for scrupulous accuracy in their broadcasts and were offended at the informal American broadcast style and occasional willingness to use questionable sources and interpretation in news reporting. They considered AFN to have accomplished a great deal, but that it was really little more than a small town operation, with announcers that were illiterate, unresourceful, and couldn't even read scripts very well.

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Armed Forces Radio I

Lead: During World War II, to the lonely GI, Armed Forces Radio was a welcome reminder of home. It is a part of the war that continues to this day.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1942 Allied forces began to assemble for the Normandy invasion in bases throughout the English countryside. For many, this was the first time away from home and they missed it. To pass the time they listened to the radio, and for that the only choice was the British Broadcasting Company. This was the heyday of the BBC. All over Europe, indeed, all over the world, those who could listen were dependent on the BBC for news that was largely free from bias, very accurate, and absent the hopeless propaganda that poured out of Berlin, Rome and Tokyo. To the American ear, however, the BBC was deadly dull. The music was boring, the humor dry and out of context, the announcers starchy and pretentious.

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History of the Internet (Update) II

Lead: No longer in service to military research, the Internet with its world wide web of interconnected billions serves the needs of scholarly research but oh so much more.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the primitive Defense oriented networks began expanding and then speaking to one another, the core of the Internet as it is known in the second decade of the 21st century, was established. Academics still post their research for comment and critique and they still communicate on the internet, but it more likely to be about sports or their favorite wines or the latest and best independent film.

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History of the Internet (Update) I

Lead: The internet began as a connection between academics with scholarly as well as military interests. It has become a world-wide universal connection for business, politics and social life.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The success of the Soviet space program sent waves of concern through the U.S. defense establishment and its university contractors where most military research was done. Since it is a given that scientific research is enormously enhanced by the free exchange of ideas, failures, concepts and successes between scholars, the U.S. government concluded that some means of fast intercommunication could not but advance work of the U.S. military By the late 1960s a primitive network connecting major universities doing research for the U.S. Defense Department was in place.

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A House Divided: (61) Cracker Secession – II

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the most intriguing questions to emerge from the Civil War involved the willingness of lower class whites, whose connection to the slave economy was distant at best, who never could ever have dreamed of even owning a slave, threw themselves into the war effort of the Confederacy, many paying the ultimate price for their loyalty. It is not an easy question, but some factors are economic, social, and regional.

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A House Divided: (60) Cracker Secession – I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the months leading up to the first large military engagement of the civil war, both North and South were gripped by war fever. All the romance and illusion of a people that had known little but peaceful development came spilling out on both sides of the divide. The righteousness of the cause of each region was taken for granted.

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A House Divided: (54) – Election of 1860 – IV

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: 1860. Four parties. Four candidates. Southern democrats nominated John Cabell Breckinridge and carried most of the states in the south. Breckinridge may have sucked enough votes away from the regular Democrats to give the Republicans pluralities in California and Oregon.

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Wheelchair Inspiration – National Veterans Wheelchair Games

Lead: America’s veterans have often paid a terrible lingering physical and mental price for their service. The National Veterans Wheelchair Games helps many rise above their suffering.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After World War II, many surviving servicemen came home severely handicapped. The loss of limbs and other types of physical incapacity compounded the normal struggle in readjusting to civilian pursuits. Through the G.I. Bill many went on to complete college, but the nation also provided ongoing rehabilitative services to terribly wounded veterans.

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