Jamestown Journey: Native American Democracy II

Lead: Among the Founders of the American republic, there was a profound respect for the political and diplomatic accomplishments of the Iroquois Federation.

            Intro.: Dan Roberts and 'A Moment in Time,' with 'Jamestown - Journey of Democracy,' tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

            Content: Democracy is a fleeting and precious thing. Rule of the people, by the people and for the people has clearly been the exception in a sordid history of monarchies, oligarchies, dictatorships and aristocracies. More often than not men and women have suffered under the rule of their so-called betters.

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Jamestown Journey: Native American Democracy I

Lead: In 1754  Benjamin Franklin modeled a colonial Plan of Union on that of the Six Nations of the Haudenosaunee (ho dee noe sho nee), the Iroquois.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and 'A Moment in Time,' with 'Jamestown - Journey of Democracy,' tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

                Content: By 1725 the English colonies of North America were pretty much established. These societies were, however, precariously perched on the Eastern seaboard. The faced westward into an enormous continental expanse filled with a large population of indigenous Americans, highly skeptical of English intentions and correctly suspicious that the colonists had designs on Indian land. Equally threatening was the growing presence of the French in what became Canada and the Mississippi Valley.

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Slaves to Virginia – I

Lead: Black Africans were brought to Virginia in 1619. Their numbers soon swelled as tobacco plantations thirsted for cheap labor and slavers on the great slave triangle trade found a new market.

                Intro.: Dan Roberts and 'A Moment in Time,' with 'Jamestown - Journey of Democracy,' tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

                Content: Portugal was the first European country to explore the West African coastline. It was seeking a trade route around Africa to the rich spice islands of the Far East. In Africa, however, it found a another form of trade more lucrative and much more ominous, human chattel. Inter-tribal warfare among Africans had long before created traffic in slaves. The Portuguese, then Dutch and English merchants after them perfected the commerce in a way that was severely damaging to African societies.

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America’s First Century: Algonquian Annihilation – II

Lead: After 1607 relations between the Jamestown English and the Chesapeake Powhatan confederation were nearly always hostile. Combined with disease and starvation, Native Americans soon faced almost complete annihilation.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Any fair and balanced study of the early years of English settlement of Virginia cannot help but provoke admiration. A primitive democracy was established. Tobacco cultivation laid the foundation for a rich commercial culture. Despite disease, starvation, bad water, and ineffective leadership, Virginians survived and gradually, fitfully established a European toe-hold on the Chesapeake. People of faith believing that Christianity brings a positive civilizing uplift, may celebrate the change in the slaves and the few Indians so converted.

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America’s First Century: Demise of the Virginia Company

Lead: After nearly two decades of heroic effort, thousands of lives, millions of dollars in today’s currency, the Virginia Company finally succumbed in 1624; brushed aside by a royal government hungry for the profits from tobacco.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: In retrospect, it is amazing that the Company lasted as long as it did.  

After a treaty with Spain in 1604 reduced tensions in the New World, a group of London investors obtained a charter from King James I. They established the Virginia Company for to plant a permanent colony within the giant continental claim laid for Henry VII by John Cabot many decades before.

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America’s First Century: Maryland – II

Lead: Colonial Maryland was established by Calvert family to provide a haven for fellow Roman Catholics. It demonstrated how precious and how hard to maintain is the modern concept of religious tolerance.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: The Calverts were English nobility, highly favored by t   he Stuart monarchs, James I, Charles I and Charles II. In 1624 George Calvert, First Baron Baltimore led his family into recusancy, they converted to Roman Catholicism though they practiced their faith quiet ly and remained truly loyal to their Protestant monarchs.  Their religion kept them from high office, but did not encumber them from seeking favors.

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America’s First Century: Maryland I

Lead: Long after England had taken the road to reform, Roman Catholics loyal to the Crown still found themselves isolated and facing discrimination. Many found a home and freedom of worship in Maryland.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Even decades England abandoned Catholicism, many regions, including Ireland and parts of Scotland, and many prominent noble families, Norfolk, Arundel, Northhampton, still adhered to the old faith. One such family, the Calverts, the Lords Baltimore, renewed an ancient attachment to Rome in the 1620s, taking advantage of the rather generous and tolerant attitude of the Stuart monarchs, James I and Charles I. They quietly converted to Catholicism.

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