The Carolina Colony and the Lords Proprietors – Part II

Lead: Between 1663 and 1729, present day North Carolina and South Carolina were ruled by the Lords Proprietors. They started out with high hopes of wealth and riches but soon discovered the bitter reality of colonization.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: In 1663, English King Charles II paid back eight wealthy political supporters who helped him regain the English throne. Their reward: an enormous land grant in North America. It was Carolina, so named in honor of his father, the late martyred King Charles I. The eight nobles were called Lords Proprietor (ruling landlords). The vast territory contained the present day states of North and South Carolina whose western borders ran all the way to the Mississippi River. The Proprietors hoped to reap rich profits through land rent, farming and the development of commerce in the region. They especially wanted to develop silk plantations, but their dreams of cornering the market of this very expensive commodity came to grief because silk failed in the region.

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The Carolina Colony and the Lords Proprietors – I

Lead: Before North and South Carolina became royal colonies in 1729, the region was ruled by the Lords Proprietors, a group of British aristocrats who were in the game of colonization to make money. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: During the 1500s both the Spanish and French attempted to colonize the Carolina coast. Their efforts were followed by a failed attempt by the English on Roanoke Island in the 1580s. After the so-called Lost Colony, it was seventy-five years before Europeans attempted another settlement in the Carolinas.

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Battle of Saratoga – Part II

Lead: On September 19, 1777, the Battle of Saratoga, a victory for the American rebels, was not only a turning point in the Revolution, but also transformed the diplomatic landscape.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: In the summer of 1777, British forces, led by General John Burgoyne, marched southward from Quebec along the Hudson River seeking to capture Albany, New York, seize control of the Hudson River, and thereby cut New England from the south. It was bold move.

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Battle of Saratoga – I

Lead: In the summer of 1777, an army led by British General John Burgoyne, marched south from Quebec to end the rebel  on in the colonies. Instead it ended in disaster for the British and was perhaps the turning point of the Revolution.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: In the summer of 1777 the British Army planned a military campaign that, if successful, would result in the occupation of Albany, New York, and control of the Hudson River – thereby separating New England from the southern colonies – and forcing an end to the rebellion. 

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Abolition – III

Lead: The end of slavery required almost a century in America following the Declaration of Independence.  It came from a powerful political movement but ultimately a great war.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: By 1800 Europeans were moving slowly but surely to abolish slavery at home and in their colonies.  In Latin America, slavery progressively to an end on a nation by nation basis.  Chile came first in 1811, Brazil last in 1888.  In the United States evolution was a much more agonizing process.

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Abolition II

Lead: For almost 3 centuries after 1500, the growing and lucrative trade and practice of slavery went unchallenged. Then an unlikely alliance of enlightened thinkers and Evangelicals began to chip away at that cruel institution. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: As the leaders of the American Revolution began to formulate their Declaration of Independence in 1776, it was clear to most of them gathered in Philadelphia that there was in colonial society a massive violation of the sentiments of that document: millions of African slaves.  Most of the founders were schooled in Enlightenment thinking which sought to advance the cause of human rights. Throughout the years of revolution and the great effort to develop an effective federal government, the demands of the economically lucrative system of slavery and the sentiments of enlightenment were engaged in a titanic struggle for the future of America.

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Jamestown Journey – Indentured Service

Lead: In the early years of the colony Virginia filled its voracious tobacco fields with workers and population through the institution  of indentured servitude.

            Intro.: Dan Roberts and 'A Moment in Time,' with 'Jamestown - Journey of Democracy,' tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

            Content: John Upton arrived in Virginia in 1622. Though he was basically penniless when he entered the colony, within fifteen years he was one of the leading citizens of Isle of Wight County across the James River from Jamestown. He was enterprising and not afraid of hard work.

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Jamestown Journey: Native American Democracy III

Lead: In the 1980s a group of scholars suggested that Native Americans might have had a part in shaping American government. Academic war followed. 

                Intro.: Dan Roberts and 'A Moment in Time,' with 'Jamestown - Journey of Democracy,' tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

                Content: The study of history can be a minefield for those who have a new idea. When in the 1980s historians Bruce Johansen, Donald Grinde and Barbara Mann began to suggest that Native American concepts and practices, specifically the Great Law of the Haudenosaunee (ho dee noe sho nee), the Iroquois Alliance, may have had some influence on the construct of the new American republic, they found themselves in the center of bitter, scholarly and cultural debate.

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