Anne Hutchinson I

Lead: In the 1630s thousands of Puritans migrated to New England. More than one would be considered a rebel. One such troublemaker was Anne Hutchinson.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Anne Marbury Hutchinson was born in Alford, Lincolnshire, England, in 1591. The daughter of an English clergyman, a troublemaker in his own right, who frequently clashed with Anglican leaders, Anne grew up to be an educated, independent thinker and trained midwife. She married an English merchant, William Hutchinson in 1612 and in 1634 they and their eleven children immigrated to the Massachusetts to escape what they considered to be religious persecution.

 

 

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The Founding and Early Years of Jamestown – II

Lead: On May 14, 1607, English colonists made their way ashore sixty miles upriver from the entrance to Chesapeake Bay. On that peninsula, now an island, they built Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in North America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Unfortunately, the settlers placed Jamestown in the wrong place. The leaders of the colony, sent out by the London-based Virginia Company, fearing an attack by the Spanish, placed their palisade on a peninsula thinking it would be more easily defended, but from the beginning the settlement was plagued with disease, starvation, dissension and Indian attacks.

 

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The Founding and Early Years of Jamestown – I

Lead: On the evening of December 19, 1606, in London, England, 144 men boarded three ships. Their destination: Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having failed to plant a colony on Roanoke Island on the Outer Banks, with mounting anxiety by 1606 England was determined to gain a grip on the land they claimed in North America. They called it Virginia (in honor of Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen).  Three ships set sail that December, the Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery. Their voyage was a long one 5000-miles the company commanded by Captain Christopher Newport.

 

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America’s First Century: Tobacco – II

Lead: Once the settlers of Jamestown owned their own land, Virginia could feed itself, but the colony was still in need of a cash crop. It had been there all along.

                Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

                Content: After the equivalent of millions of dollars invested and the loss of hundreds of settlers, after 1616, the Virginia Company finally and gave the colonists their own land. Fifty acres was apportioned to each colonist. This led to increased migration. The “head-right” system gave land to each person paying their way to the colony. Slowly, fitfully, the colony began to feed itself. The key to Virginia’s ultimate success had been there all along.

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America’s First Century: Tobacco I

Lead: In 1615, the English colony at Jamestown was almost defunct. Within a decade the colony had turned itself around. Two reasons: incentives and a cash crop.

            Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

            Content: Since 1607 the Virginia Company, owners of the Jamestown colony had poured nearly ₤50,000 or $11,000,000 in today’s currency into its failing North American investment. In addition over 1700 colonists had come to the New World. Most of them had died.

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America’s First Century: Virginia, Bloody Virginia

Lead: Far more potent threats to the survival of Virginia than attacks by Native Americans or the Spanish were disease and hunger. In the early years, people arrived and died - in droves.

            Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

            Content: The Virginia Company had it figured out. They instructed the leaders of the colony never to allow Native Americans to see an English colonist die. If the natives did not think white men were mere mortals, they would be far more cooperative. Native Americans must have thought such a dictum rather laughable as they watched from afar for Jamestown was a killing field. Of the initial 104 settlers less than 40 were alive nine months later. The company could hardly keep up with the carnage.

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The Carolina Colony and the Lords Proprietors – Part II

Lead: Between 1663 and 1729, present day North Carolina and South Carolina were ruled by the Lords Proprietors. They started out with high hopes of wealth and riches but soon discovered the bitter reality of colonization.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: In 1663, English King Charles II paid back eight wealthy political supporters who helped him regain the English throne. Their reward: an enormous land grant in North America. It was Carolina, so named in honor of his father, the late martyred King Charles I. The eight nobles were called Lords Proprietor (ruling landlords). The vast territory contained the present day states of North and South Carolina whose western borders ran all the way to the Mississippi River. The Proprietors hoped to reap rich profits through land rent, farming and the development of commerce in the region. They especially wanted to develop silk plantations, but their dreams of cornering the market of this very expensive commodity came to grief because silk failed in the region.

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The Carolina Colony and the Lords Proprietors – I

Lead: Before North and South Carolina became royal colonies in 1729, the region was ruled by the Lords Proprietors, a group of British aristocrats who were in the game of colonization to make money. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: During the 1500s both the Spanish and French attempted to colonize the Carolina coast. Their efforts were followed by a failed attempt by the English on Roanoke Island in the 1580s. After the so-called Lost Colony, it was seventy-five years before Europeans attempted another settlement in the Carolinas.

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