Mary Walker

Lead: Brilliant, stubborn, and independent, Mary Walker led the way in more ways than simple fashion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: “Why don’t you wear proper clothing? That toggery is neither one thing nor the other!” General William Tecumseh Sherman to Mary Walker, who was the first woman to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. In her long life Mary Charles Walker rarely bent to society’s demands. She became one of the first women physicians in the U.S., served as an army combat surgeon, and was a life-long participant in the fight for women’s rights. Women need two things, she thought, the right to vote and the right to wear any clothes they desire. She was almost always wore trousers.

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James Lusk Alcorn: Mississippi Scalawag

Lead: Reconstruction Governor James Lusk Alcorn of Mississippi was considered a Scalawag.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: To the majority of whites in post-Civil War Mississippi, people like Alcorn were social pariahs. Unlike the carpetbaggers, Northerners who came to take advantage of a beaten and struggling South, he and other native citizens who cooperated with the Federal occupation forces were held in special contempt. Actually, he had a long career of faithful service to his state and, absent the deep emotions growing out of the South's defeat and humiliation, would have continued to have enjoyed support and political power.

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Presidential Wit: Abraham Lincoln

Lead: Of the weapons available to the politician, among the most powerful is humor. No one was better at wielding that weapon than Abraham Lincoln.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Few politicians can survive if they become an object of laughter and ridicule. On the other hand, those seeking office who have the ability to use humor as a weapon against opponents or as a means of giving themselves a more sympathetic and down-to-earth image, go a long way to winning the support and perhaps the affection of the electorate. A sense of humor is not required for election, but it helps, both to soften the blow of losing or, even better, to keep political success in correct perspective.

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Buffalo Soldiers II (African American Soldiers after the Civil War)

Lead: During the Indian wars, the Buffalo Soldiers, units made up of African Americans, served with great distinction.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Of the Native American clans who inhabited the West during the white settlement of the frontier, none were more resistant than the Apache. Unlike northern plains Indians, Sioux, Cheyenne, or Commanche, who fought mostly to keep miners, ranchers and hunters off their reserved territory, the Apache had lived for centuries alongside Spanish and then Mexican villages, sometimes attacking, sometimes trading with their white neighbors. They were consummate mountain guerrilla warriors, able to spring from ambushes with deadly effect and then cleverly elude their pursuers.

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Buffalo Soldiers I (African American Soldiers after the Civil War)

Lead: Following the Civil War, U.S. Army regiments made up of African American soldiers proved themselves among the most efficient and professional fighting men in the Indian Wars.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the Civil War over 180,000 blacks served in volunteer regiments fighting with the U.S. Army. They filled out units and even comprised one entire corps, the 25th, which helped occupy Richmond in the closing days of the war. Despite valiant and faithful service in the face of great danger, no African American troops were allowed to serve in regular army units. That all changed in the summer of 1866 when four infantry and two cavalry regiments were created by Congress to be made up exclusively of black enlisted men. Most of their service was on the frontier where Indian opponents nicknamed them Buffalo Soldiers.

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Compromise of 1833 IV

Lead: Conflict over a protective tariff almost produced Civil War in the United States in 1833.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Angered over protective tariffs which benefited Northern industry and hurt Southern farmers, Southerners, led by United States Vice-President John C. Calhoun of South Carolina in the early 1830s, advocated nullification. If states were convinced the Federal government had passed laws that were unconstitutional, they could nullify them, declare them inoperative inside their state's boundaries.

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Compromise of 1833 III

Lead: The debate over a protective tariff nearly brought the United States to Civil War in 1833.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the late 1820s, Northern manufacturers wanted a high tariff to protect their businesses from foreign competition. Southern farmers despised protective tariffs. They wanted free trade to buy cheaper goods from Europe and to discourage other countries from imposing retaliatory tariffs which made it harder to sell Southern rice and cotton overseas.

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Compromise of 1833 II

Lead: In late 1832 the state of South Carolina declared that it had the right to nullify or ignore Federal law within its boundaries.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At its heart, the U.S. Constitution was a compromise, more precisely, it was a series of compromises, between rural and urban areas, between small states and large ones, between those living on the frontier and maritime interests on the coast, between slaveholders and those opposed to this institution and embarrassed by its glaring violation of the nation's ideals.

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