The Man Pursued by War (McLean) II

Lead: In 1861 the first major battle in Virginia took place in the front yard of Wilmer McLean along Bull Run Creek. Seeking to protect his family from the fighting he moved them to south central Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was not uncommon for civilians to remove themselves from areas of intense fighting. Up to this point war was, for the most part, left to soldiers. As the war intensified Federal generals such as Sherman in Georgia and Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley made destruction of civilian property a matter of military policy. Sherman, in particular, boasted that he had destroyed $100,000,000 in property during his dash from Atlanta to Savannah in the fall of 1864.

 

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The Man Pursued by War (McLean) I

Lead: In 1850 Wilmer McLean, a prominent merchant of Alexandria, Virginia married the widow Virginia Beverley Mason. They lived at her plantation, Yorkshire, in Fairfax County, Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: McLean was a son of one of the most prominent commercial families of Alexandria. His marriage to Virginia Mason, among Virginia's wealthiest women, brought him extensive responsibilities as manager of the family's holdings. Yorkshire was a 1200 acre tract close by the small creek known as Bull Run just outside of the village of Manassas Junction.

In the spring of 1861, the McLeans and their neighbors were well aware of the approach of war. The Confederate army stationed troops at Manassas to protect the area as it was a vital rail junction linking the principle north-south line with one that rest west into the Shenandoah Valley. This made the region a military target and on June 1st, General Pierre G.T. Beauregard arrived to take charge since in was becoming evident that Federal forces were beginning to move into the area with an eye toward taking the junction.

 

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LFM – Walt Whitman

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Though he is perhaps best known as the “Poet of Democracy,” chronicling the lives of working men in whose vocations he apprenticed as a youth and later, Walt Whitman also portrayed the heroic and tragic adventure of war, detailing the crushed dreams, lingering hopes and heartbreak of soldiers, North and South, in the Republic’s greatest epic, the American Civil War.

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A House Divided: The Irresistible Force of Cotton

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the years leading up to the Civil War, there was some Southern investment in manufacturing and transportation, but the vast bulk of Southern capital, and there was plenty of it, was tied up and thrown into land and slaves. Historians are divided as to whether this uniquely southern obsession with owning slaves and the agricultural land on which they worked was rational from an economic viewpoint. A case can be made on either side of the issue. Discounting any moral argument, in the 1850s the average investment return on the purchase of a field hand has been calculated to have been around 8%, which is not too shabby in an era of low taxes. Nevertheless, such investment would hardly prepare the region to wage modern warfare. One frustrated Mississippi industrial promoter lamented that this was what drove the lawyer to pour over his books and the merchant to stretch his tape – to buy land and slaves.

A House Divided: The Southern Economy

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As the American sectional crisis loomed in the 1840s and 1850s, thoughtful Southern leaders were growing alarmed over the economic disparity between slave and free states. By nearly indicator, the region that would comprise the Confederacy was falling behind. Industrial canal mileage was just 14% of the national total. Southern railroads comprised about a third of the nation’s trackage. By the war years, Southern manufacturing capacity was less than a fifth of the national whole. For instance, a single Massachusetts town, Lowell, had more textile spindles in operation than all eleven Confederate states combined.

A House Divided: The South at the Beginning of the War – I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As the bonds that held the American Republic frayed and gradually reached the breaking point in the beginning of the 1860s, the two regions faced the prospect of separation and perhaps violent conflict. They were by no means equally matched.

A House Divided: The North on the Eve of War – III Industrial Behemoth

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: On the day before Christmas, 1860, the future scourge of Georgia, William Tecumseh Sherman, graduate of West Point and soon to be the late Superintendent of the institution that would become Louisiana State University, was speaking of the looming conflict with his friend and eager secessionist, Professor David French Boyd of Virginia. “The North can make a steam engine, locomotive or railway car; hardly a yard of cloth or pair of shoes can you make. You are rushing into war with one of the most powerful, ingeniously mechanical and determined people on earth, right at your doors. You are bound to fail.” He was supremely correct.

A House Divided: The North on the Eve of War – II: Transportation Revolution

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As the nation approached its greatest conflict, the two regions were unevenly matched in transportation and industrial power. In order to prosecute the war that was looming on the horizon, the North was able to bring men, supplies and the machines of war to the battlefield in a way that was unequalled by its Southern opponents. Historians have called this early nineteenth century phenomenon a transportation revolution. Improved roads, canals and the largest railroad network in the world vastly increased transportation capacity of the nation and reduced the price of transported goods. As the opening of hostilities approached it was clear that the significant balance in transportation strength was in North.