The Man Pursued by War (McLean) II

Lead: In 1861 the first major battle in Virginia took place in the front yard of Wilmer McLean along Bull Run Creek. Seeking to protect his family from the fighting he moved them to south central Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was not uncommon for civilians to remove themselves from areas of intense fighting. Up to this point war was, for the most part, left to soldiers. As the war intensified Federal generals such as Sherman in Georgia and Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley made destruction of civilian property a matter of military policy. Sherman, in particular, boasted that he had destroyed $100,000,000 in property during his dash from Atlanta to Savannah in the fall of 1864.

 

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The Man Pursued by War (McLean) I

Lead: In 1850 Wilmer McLean, a prominent merchant of Alexandria, Virginia married the widow Virginia Beverley Mason. They lived at her plantation, Yorkshire, in Fairfax County, Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: McLean was a son of one of the most prominent commercial families of Alexandria. His marriage to Virginia Mason, among Virginia's wealthiest women, brought him extensive responsibilities as manager of the family's holdings. Yorkshire was a 1200 acre tract close by the small creek known as Bull Run just outside of the village of Manassas Junction.

In the spring of 1861, the McLeans and their neighbors were well aware of the approach of war. The Confederate army stationed troops at Manassas to protect the area as it was a vital rail junction linking the principle north-south line with one that rest west into the Shenandoah Valley. This made the region a military target and on June 1st, General Pierre G.T. Beauregard arrived to take charge since in was becoming evident that Federal forces were beginning to move into the area with an eye toward taking the junction.

 

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LFM – Walt Whitman

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Though he is perhaps best known as the “Poet of Democracy,” chronicling the lives of working men in whose vocations he apprenticed as a youth and later, Walt Whitman also portrayed the heroic and tragic adventure of war, detailing the crushed dreams, lingering hopes and heartbreak of soldiers, North and South, in the Republic’s greatest epic, the American Civil War.

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LFM – George Henry Sharpe II

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: George Henry Sharpe, head of the Bureau of Military Intelligence, through the systematic assembly and analysis of data from multiple sources, provided Union commanders their eyes and a substantial edge in the last two years of the Civil War.

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LFM – George Henry Sharpe I

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When General Joseph “Fightin’ Joe” Hooker took over the Army of the Potomac in early 1863 he realized he was fighting blind. The only real intelligence capability that the eastern Union Army had up to this point had been an effort by the Chicago detective Allan Pinkerton who departed when President Lincoln relieved General George McClellan.

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LFM – Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the 20th Maine on Little Round Top

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: In early July 1863 the contending forces of Union and Confederate converged on the small Pennsylvania town of Gettysburg. It was Gen. Robert E. Lee's second invasion of the North. He was trying to get between the Army of the Potomac and Washington and bring the war to an end. On July 1st alert Union cavalry units began to gather and blocked his path thus starting the decisive three-day battle that would decide the Civil War.

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Texas and the Civil War – Part II

Lead: Although there were few military engagements in Texas during the War Between the States, thousands of Texans went east into the fighting and Texas was the scene of the last battle.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Texas joined the Confederacy in March 1861 and supplied the Confederacy with as many as 90,000 soldiers during the four years of conflict. Although several Texas regiments were deployed east of the Mississippi, about two-thirds in the west and the southwest defending Union attempts at invasion, being particularly vigilant on ports and borders, through which supplies flowed to support the Confederate war effort. Troops also warded off Indian and Mexican attacks and  other regiments were sent west to expand the Confederacy into Arizona and New Mexico.

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Texas in the Civil War – Part I

Lead: On January 28, 1861, the state of Texas seceded from the Union. It  and joined the Confederacy the following March, but this action was not universally popular. Even Sam Houston was opposed.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Immediately following the election of Abraham Lincoln in November of 1860, seven states from the Deep South left, viewing Lincoln’s election as a threat to  slavery and the spread of slavery to the western territories. After the fall of Fort Sumter in April four more states departed, those in the upper south, bringing the Confederate total to eleven.

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