Western Virginia Secedes from Virginia – II

Lead: In June 1863, West Virginia, having seceded from Confederate Virginia, became the thirty-fifth state in the Federal Union of the United States of America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the onset of the Civil War, major tension had developed between the eastern region of Virginia (east of the Alleghenies) and the west counties on the other side of the mountains. As sectionalism between the north and the south led to war, sectionalism in Virginia reached a crescendo. In the Commonwealth, before the Civil War, political and economic power lay in the east in the tidewater and piedmont regions where wealthy landowners had grown dependent on slave labor to work their plantations. In contrast, western Virginia was a land of frontiersmen and immigrants who cleared their own land and worked small farms.

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Western Virginia Secedes from Virginia- I

Lead: In 1863, during the Civil War, the western counties of Confederate Virginia, after decades of dissatisfaction, seceded from the Commonwealth to form a new state as part of the Federal Union.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Following the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860, eleven states, including Virginia, seceded from the Union. Most of the Virginia population west of the Appalachians opposed secession. Wealthy plantation owners, dependent on slave labor, dominated the eastern tidewater region and southside Virginia. The western part of the state, the trans-Allegheny region, was populated by frontiersmen and late-arriving immigrants from Scotland, Germany, Ireland and Wales. They raised their own livestock and farmed land they had cleared with their own hands. Comparatively few slaves or slaveholders could be found in the west.

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Last Full Measure: Raphael Semmes, Rebel Sailor

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: On Sunday morning June 19, 1864, Captain Raphael Semmes, sailed the pride of the Confederate Navy, CSS Alabama, out of Cherbourg, France, for her last battle.

Semmes, a United States Naval officer, was born in Maryland but had settled in Alabama. He offered his services to the Confederacy in 1861 and commanded two ships; but on Alabama he made his reputation. Alabama had just been around the world on voyage of destruction about which US naval solicitor, John A. Bolles, later remarked, "Never in naval history has there been so striking an example of the tremendous power of mischief exacted by a single cruiser as Alabama under Raphael Semmes."

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LFM – Walt Whitman

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Though he is perhaps best known as the “Poet of Democracy,” chronicling the lives of working men in whose vocations he apprenticed as a youth and later, Walt Whitman also portrayed the heroic and tragic adventure of war, detailing the crushed dreams, lingering hopes and heartbreak of soldiers, North and South, in the Republic’s greatest epic, the American Civil War.

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The Man Pursued by War (McLean) II

Lead: In 1861 the first major battle in Virginia took place in the front yard of Wilmer McLean along Bull Run Creek. Seeking to protect his family from the fighting he moved them to south central Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was not uncommon for civilians to remove themselves from areas of intense fighting. Up to this point war was, for the most part, left to soldiers. As the war intensified Federal generals such as Sherman in Georgia and Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley made destruction of civilian property a matter of military policy. Sherman, in particular, boasted that he had destroyed $100,000,000 in property during his dash from Atlanta to Savannah in the fall of 1864.

 

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The Man Pursued by War (McLean) I

Lead: In 1850 Wilmer McLean, a prominent merchant of Alexandria, Virginia married the widow Virginia Beverley Mason. They lived at her plantation, Yorkshire, in Fairfax County, Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: McLean was a son of one of the most prominent commercial families of Alexandria. His marriage to Virginia Mason, among Virginia's wealthiest women, brought him extensive responsibilities as manager of the family's holdings. Yorkshire was a 1200 acre tract close by the small creek known as Bull Run just outside of the village of Manassas Junction.

In the spring of 1861, the McLeans and their neighbors were well aware of the approach of war. The Confederate army stationed troops at Manassas to protect the area as it was a vital rail junction linking the principle north-south line with one that rest west into the Shenandoah Valley. This made the region a military target and on June 1st, General Pierre G.T. Beauregard arrived to take charge since in was becoming evident that Federal forces were beginning to move into the area with an eye toward taking the junction.

 

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Beefsteak Raid

Lead: In the autumn of 1864 the Confederate Army of General Robert E. Lee faced more than Grant's forces across the breastworks at Petersburg. They were hungry.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Nearly everything was short in the rebel ranks that fall, but Lee's cavalry chief, now Wade Hampton of South Carolina after the death at Yellow Tavern of Jeb Stuart, figured a way of relieving the empty bellies. He had word from one of this scouts that five miles east of Grant's headquarters on the James River in the vicinity of Coggins Point was a sizable herd of lightly defended cattle. "Three thousand beeves," went the report. This was a perfect gambit for the fun-loving, popular Hampton. He could embarrass the Yankees, raise Southern morale, and deal with hunger in the ranks with one blow. 

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White Officers and Colored Troops – Part III

Lead: On July 18, 1863, the 54th Massachusetts Infantry led a daring assault on Fort Wagner, South Carolina. It was the largest civil war engagement involving black troops

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.               

Content: The 54th Massachusetts Infantry was made up of black troops and white officers. It was one of the first regiments formed after the U.S. government authorized the enlistment of African Americans. It was Federal policy, however, that they had to be led by white officers. Early in 1863 Governor John Andrew of Massachusetts, an abolitionist and advocate of African American enlistment, began organizing the unit. He was committed to forming a model regiment and offered command to Robert G. Shaw, a battle-tested, well-educated, young officer from a prominent Boston abolitionist family. Shaw accepted, earned the respect of his regiment, which included former slaves, free blacks and the most well known of their recruits – Lewis and Charles Douglass – the sons of abolitionist militant Frederick Douglass. Under Shaw’s command, the regiment was organized, disciplined, and operated on the assumption that the notion blacks could not fight on a par with white troops was inaccurate and emerged from social bigotry.

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