Confucius II

Lead: After his death in 479 B.C.E., as they scattered throughout China, the disciples of Confucius spread his conversations and teachings recorded in the years soon after his lifetime.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: What we know of Confucius, the brilliant Chinese teacher and scholar, does not come from his own writings but from those his followers and is known as the Analects of Confucius. This is considered perhaps the most influential work on eastern thought and philosophy today. Since parts of the Analects were recorded close to his lifetime, this is considered the most authentic record of the teachings of Confucius. Some recorded traditions about Confucius appeared centuries after his lifetime and are considered mythological.

 

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Cultural Revolution of China II

Lead: The shock troops of the 1960s upheaval, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, were the Red Guards. They became an irresistible force of terror inflicting brutal treatment on thousands of Chinese citizens and destroying priceless parts of China's cultural heritage.   

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1966, Chinese Communist Chairman Mao Zedong launched the Cultural Revolution. Ostensibly, it was a movement designed to shore up the communist movement in China but in reality it was an ill disguised means for Mao, then in his twilight years, to protect his own power and firmly establish his legacy. To accomplish this, the chairman caused the creation of an army of young idealists, the Red Guards, and sent them out to attack any who would deviate from his own principles.

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Cultural Revolution of China I

Lead:  In 1966, Chinese leader Mao Zedong launched the Cultural Revolution. It was an attempt to shore up his power and secure his legacy long into the future. It ended up nearly destroying China. 

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Mao had been the leader and the heart of Chinese Communism since the 1920s. Though not the founder of the party, he had nursed the movement in its infancy, preserved it during the dark years when in order to survive, the Red Army in various groups had to flee by the Long March into interior China during the Civil War. He had led the Communists in common cause with Chiang Kai-shek and the Kuomintang against the Japanese in the 1930s and 1940s and in 1949 had triumphed over Chiang, banishing the latter to Taiwan and establishing undisputed Communist control of the mainland.

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The Great Wall of China – Part II

Lead: Much of the Great Wall of China, as it is known today, was constructed during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: The Great Wall of China that we are familiar with today was built by hand during the Ming Dynasty beginning in the late 16th century. The longest structure ever built by mankind, The Great Wall is not actually a continuous structure but a network of walls and fortifications.

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The Great Wall of China – Part I

Lead: Considered to be one the greatest engineering and building feats of mankind, The Great Wall of China was designed to keep the barbarians out.

                 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: The Great Wall of China, a contemporary term for a system of defensive barriers to ward off invaders from the north, was built along the northern border of China between the east coast and north central China, covering a 1500 mile border. Including branches and the undulating paths that the walls follow along rivers, mountains and valleys, the total length of the walls is believed to be about 4,800 miles. Contrary to popular myth, the Great Wall of China is not a continuous wall but an amalgamation of walls and fortifications built and rebuilt by several dynasties over a period of 1300 years. The present wall was built chiefly by the Ming Dynasty, who ruled between A.D. 1368-1644.  The height of the wall ranges from 15 to 35 feet with a 13-foot roadway along the top.

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