Castro’s Early Years

Lead: Often political leadership is forged out of initial failure.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was after midnight in the seaside community of Santiago de Cuba. It was late July, 1953. A Buick, blue with a white roof, stopped in front of a small farmhouse. Palm trees flashed in the headlights. A man emerged, tall, powerful, with a thin mustache. Inside the house 100 men and 2 women waited. They had come in small groups by bus, car and train from all parts of Cuba. None of them knew the exact purpose of the trip.

 

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Cuba: Valeriano Weyler Y Nicolau

Lead: Among the most hated representatives of the old Spanish regime was the man sent to crush the Revolution in 1896, General Valeriano Weyler y Nicolau (val ay ri yano wayler ee Nee co lau)

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Born in 1838, Weyler was an ambitious, highly decorated and innovative officer in the Spanish Army, serving in various posts around the world. His experience fighting insurgents in the Philippines in the early 1890s prepared for this most infamous role, that of Governor General of Cuba with instructions to root out the Revolution and restore the lucrative sugar industry.

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Medical Miracle in Panama III

Lead: Sanitation made possible the construction of the Panama Canal.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the years following the Spanish American War, Army Surgeon Dr. Walter Reed had transformed the city of Havana, Cuba, virtually eliminating the tropical diseases of malaria and yellow fever. He did so by rejecting the common medical wisdom of the time that such illnesses were caused by bad air or swamp gas. Reed went after the mosquito which, some scientists at the time believed, transmitted the diseases when it fed upon a victim. Reed cleaned up the city. Malaria and yellow fever were almost completely eradicated.

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Medical Miracle in Panama II

Lead: Before they could build the Panama Canal, American engineers had to eradicate malaria and yellow fever.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Attempting to duplicate their triumph in the construction of the Suez Canal, French engineers were defeated in great measure by two deadly diseases. Malaria and yellow fever had for time immemorial been the curse of the tropics. Thousands died before the French gave up the quest in the 1880s.

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Medical Miracle in Panama I

Lead: Before breaching the Panamanian land bridge, the builders of the Isthmus Canal knew they first had to deal with disease.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After his brilliant construction of the Suez Canal, Ferdinand de Lesseps set out in the 1870s to duplicate his achievement by crafting a shipping canal across the Isthmus of Panama. He failed. De Lesseps underestimated the enormity of the task, his technology was much too primitive, and the French design for a sea-level canal was fatally flawed, but much of the failure can be attributed to a deadly pair of diseases. Malaria and yellow fever took thousands of lives and put many more in bed for weeks of convalescence and depression. Engineers freshly graduated from the École Polytechnique in Paris would arrive in Colon filled with enthusiastic anticipation and die within a week. Thousands of manual laborers recruited from Caribbean islands fell victim in this grim harvest of death.

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