Constable Alexander’s Fight for Life

Lead: With death clearly at hand, the physicians attending Albert Alexander tried something different.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Albert Alexander was at forty-three a healthy physical specimen, a constable in the police force of the County of Oxford, England. In December, 1940 he was accidentally scratched on his cheek by a rose thorn. The scratch became infected. By Christmas he was fighting for his life in the Radcliffe Infirmary. The villains in his struggle were two fairly common forms of bacteria: Staphylococcus and Streptococcus and they were winning.

 

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Charge of the Light Brigade III

Lead: Made famous in verse and legend the Charge and decimation of the Light Brigade was due to a misunderstood order.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Determined to punish the Russians for having their aggressive designs in the Balkans, the French and British in the fall of 1854 attacked the port of Sebastopol, Russia's Black Sea Naval base in the Crimean peninsula. They were not having an easy time of it. The allies were just barely able to hold onto their base in the small port of Balaclava.

The Charge of the Light Brigade took place on a flat plateau above Balaclava. It was split by a range of low hills, the Causeway Heights running if one can imagine the face of a clock from nine southeast to about four on the face of a clock. By October 25, 1854 the Russians had control of the Causeway Heights and their artillery threatened the city.

 

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The Charge of the Light Brigade II

Lead: England and France wanted to teach Russia a lesson. They declared war in 1854.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Fearful of Russian expansion into the Balkans, Britain and France decided to take the port of Sebastopol located on the Crimean peninsula which jutted out into the Black Sea from the southern Russian. In the fall of 1854 British and French set up their headquarters in the Port of Balaclava southeast of Sebastopol and from there conducted assaults on the City.

In the meantime the Russians had not been idle, they had an army of about 25,000 at the center of the peninsula and were beginning to pick at the edges of Allied lines.

 

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Charge of the Light Brigade I

Lead: Remembered in verse and song, the futile charge of the Light Brigade was the result of incompetence and misunderstanding but remains one of the most extraordinary examples of personal gallantry and courage in modern warfare.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: The verdict of history has not been kind to the Crimean War fought in the mid-1850s. Deservedly so. Few Europeans had even heard of the Crimea, the peninsula which juts out into the Black Sea from the south of Russia. The returns of the war were very meager: thousands of deaths, enormous expenditure and little tangible result.

 

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Benedict Arnold – II

Lead: Embittered by what he considered lack of recognition of his clearly superior leadership and bravery in battle, Benedict Arnold embarked on a course that made him the most famous traitor in American history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the fall of 1777, Connecticut native Benedict Arnold was recuperating from a serious leg injury received at the Battle of Saratoga. In that most decisive American victory in the Revolution, Arnold’s leadership had been critical, but his commander Horatio Gates and the Continental Congress were tardy in according him proper recognition. This was not the first time Arnold had felt passed over for promotion and slighted by his superiors. Nevertheless, he had earned the great admiration of George Washington and eventually Congress recognized him for his role at Saratoga and restored his rank.

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The Lost Colony III

Lead: Twice the English tried and failed to establish a colony at Roanoke Island on the coast of Carolina in the 1580s. Twice they failed.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The first attempt was poorly planned. The colonist's nearly starved to death and then were hostile to the native Roanoke tribe, who had kept them alive during the winter of 1585 with food. The expected re-supply of 1586 was delayed, therefore the colonists watched with relief when sails appeared on the horizon. Sir Francis Drake had arrived expecting to use the colony for a base in his attacks on Spanish, but instead found it in crisis. He packed up the remaining settlers and took them back to England. When the re-supply ships finally arrived three weeks later, the colony had left. Leaving a holding party of fifteen men, the fleet departed. The fifteen were never seen again.

 

 

The Lost Colony II

Lead: In 1585 and then again in 1587 Sir Walter Raleigh sent colonists to the coast of what is now North Carolina. The last colony was the lost colony.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Tension with Spain had been growing for several years as England began looking for a base in North American from which to conduct privateer raids against Spanish shipping in the Caribbean. There was also a hope that, just as in the case of the Spanish colonies in the south, gold and silver mines might be there for the taking. Raleigh sent his first group in 1585 to Roanoke Island in the Outer Banks. The choice of a site proved a poor one. The soil was infertile, the water supplies meager and the erratic weather and shallow inlets of the region have earned it the well-deserved reputa-tion as the "graveyard of the Atlantic."

 

 

The Lost Colony I

Lead: In 1585 England attempted to establish a colony on the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: England came late to the colonial enterprise. During the 1400s and 1500s while Portugal worked its way down the African coast on the way to India and Spain tapped the rich silver and gold reserves of Central and South America, the English only toyed with the notion of the expanding globe. King Henry VII financed John Cabot's expedi-tions to North America in 1497 and 1498 but when Cabot failed to return from the second trip, interest waned, England became distracted by internal religious conflict, and no colonies were established. However, the nation maintained its claim to North America and late in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, with tensions mounting between England and Spain, with stories of fabulously wealthy gold and silver mines ripe for the taking, interest in an English presence in the New World began to revive.