Little Jack Horner IV

Lead: Beginning in 1536, King Henry VIII of England began to confiscate the once-Catholic monasteries of England. His seizure of Glastonbury was made easier by the treachery of Thomas Horner.

Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Most of the monasteries submitted to this process with little resistance. Henry actually showed some compassion, giving some of the priests he considered unemployable a small pension for life, but those who resisted, he crushed ruthlessly. One those who held out was Richard Whiting, the Abbot of the ancient Cathedral at Glastonbury, near the western coast just south of Bristol. Whiting was eighty and had little to lose, but he tried to placate the King. He sent a Christmas present, the deed to twelve manorial estates which he hid in a Christmas pie. He entrusted this pastry delight to his steward, Thomas Horner, and sent him off to London. Horner was a realist. He knew very well that Whiting's gesture was useless. Henry would have Glastonbury. On the way, the disloyal steward popped open the pie and stole the deed to the rich manorial estate at Mells.

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Little Jack Horner III

Lead: Faced with confiscation, Abbot Richard Whiting of the Cathedral at Glastonbury, at Christmas 1539, sent his trusted steward, Thomas Horner with a gift to appease King Henry VIII. This futile gesture turned out to be rich opportunity for Jack Horner.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In its early years, the Reformation in England, was none to secure. King Henry VIII remained a theological and emotional Catholic until the day he died. The primary reason for removing England from allegiance to the Roman Church in 1534 was that the pope refused to give him a divorce from his first wife who could not produce for him a male heir. The Protestants around Henry were always a little nervous that the King, on a whim, might act on his true Catholic sentiments and go back to Rome. His chief minister, Thomas Cromwell, convinced the King that if he dissolved the monasteries of England he could accomplish two things. By confiscating them the King could fill his depleted treasury, something that always appealed to Henry, and, because many monasteries were hotbeds of Catholic sentiment, he could suppress a potential threat to the newly Protestant Church of England. In 1536, Henry and Cromwell began to close the monasteries. The King kept some for himself, but wisely distributed the balance to his family, friends and supporters throughout the realm. This land transfer meant a large number of influential people would be committed by pure self-interest to the survival of the Reformation.

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Little Jack Horner II

Lead: To get his hands on the monastic lands of Glastonbury Cathedral in 1539, King Henry VIII of England relied on the treachery of the Abbot's assistant, Thomas Horner.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: To secure his family's lock on the English throne, Henry VIII felt he had to have a male heir. Since his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, had failed to produce a son, he divorced her. To do so meant England had to renounce the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Pope. Henry became the Supreme Head of the Church and then, beginning in 1536, started closing the monasteries, many of which were lingering hotbeds of Catholic sentiment in England.

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Little Jack Horner I

Lead: "Little Jack Horner sat in a corner eating of Christmas pie,..." Legend has it that his name wasn't Jack but he definitely pulled out a plum.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: King Henry VIII of England had a serious problem. As he moved into middle age he began to despair of ever producing a son with his Queen Catherine of Aragon. She was deeply devoted to her husband but could not deliver to him the male heir which he was convinced would secure his family's lock on the English throne into the future. After repeated attempts to convince Pope Clement VII to dissolve his marriage, he renounced the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Church. With the Act of Supremacy in 1534, the King, not the Pope, became head of the Church in England. With this new power he divorced Catherine and married Anne Boleyn. Anne did not give him a son, but her successor, Jane Seymour, did and Henry considered his dynastic problems largely solved.

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Narvik – II

Lead:  In the Spring of 1940 the town of Narvik on the northwest coast of Norway was the scene of one of the first naval battles of World War II.

Intro. A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The combination of geography and strategic importance conspired to prevent Norway from maintaining its neutrality in the early months of World War II. Germany needed the Swedish iron ore that was shipped through Narvik during the winter months. When it became apparent that Britain was going to intervene, Hitler ordered the invasion of Norway.

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Narvik – Part I

Lead:  High on the shoulders of the Scandinavian land mass is the small sub-arctic town of Narvik, Norway. In the early days of World War II, Narvik was a strategic target of the British and the Germans.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Until the spring of 1940, Norway had hoped to preserve its neutrality, but it was soon apparent that geography would bring that dream to grief. The coast of Norway was too important for the Germans to let it fall into allied hands. Much of German iron ore came from mines in northern Sweden. During most of the year the ore was shipped through the Gulf of Bothnia and the Baltic Sea, but in winter the Gulf froze and the ore was sent overland to the port of Narvik on the Atlantic coast of Norway and from there through the Leads, a narrow waterway between the mainland and a series of barrier island just off the coast.

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Lexington, Massachusetts, 1775 II

 

Lead: Having killed Minutemen on the Lexington, Massachusetts green in April, 1775, British regulars moved off to Concord.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The British soldiers were sent by Governor Gage to capture provincial arms and the leaders of the Massachusetts rebellion, John Hancock and Sam Adams. In the end they got neither, but like a man sticking his hand into a hornets’ nest they stirred up a Revolution.

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Lexington, Massachusetts, 1775 I

 

Lead: A brief skirmish between British Regulars and colonial militia in Lexington, Massachusetts in April 1775 set off a revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Thomas Gage, the Royal Governor of Massachusetts in the spring of 1775, liked Americans, but it seemed as though the sentiment was not mutual, at least among a certain number of his colonial charges. Led by Samuel Adams and John Hancock, some of the provincials were in thinly disguised rebellion. They had tossed together a Provincial Congress and had begun to assemble war materiel in the tiny village of Concord westward, 21 miles up the Boston Neck. Gage, under pressure from London, had his eyes on those arms and the colonial leaders, to seize the weapons and arrest Hancock and Adams.

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