Jamestown Journey: Bacon’s Rebellion

Lead: In the summer of 1676, the colony of Virginia, already locked in an Indian war, broke into the conflict later called Bacon’s Rebellion.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: Climactic historical incidents can sometimes act as a snapshot – of an era, a period, a personality. Few snapshots depict late 17th Century colonial Virginia as does Bacon’s Rebellion.

Gilbert Keith (G.K.) Chesterton II

Lead: G.K Chesterton was known as the Prince of Paradox and his opinions defied normal categories. Liberal, conservative, believer, and skeptic: he infuriated and charmed them all.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Gilbert Chesterton was a large man, 6’ 4” in his prime and weighing over 300 pounds. Yet it was the prodigious mind of this giant sprite, treating each subject with humor as well as complexity, that stretched across the disciplines of literature, politics and religion. He did so in a way that claimed the appreciative imagination of multiple generations of admirers, including those who absolutely disagreed with everything he believed, such as George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells and J.M. Barrie. He debated them and their advocacy of modernism in print and later on the BBC and they loved him for it. All the while he punched at his favorite targets with perhaps the richest sense of humor of his compatriots.

 

 

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Gilbert Keith (G.K.) Chesterton I

Lead: In turn of twentieth century Britain no star in the literary firmament shone brighter than that of G.K. Chesterton. Author, critic, journalist, and Christian apologist, his influence stretched across four decades.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Gilbert Keith Chesterton had London middle-class roots, attended St. Paul’s School, University College, London and the Slade School of Art. As a young man, he abandoned formal education to enter the world of publishing and journalism. For years, his increasingly popular commentary on just about any subject in the universe was inhaled by an adoring readership in periodicals such as The Speaker, London Daily News, Illustrated London News, Eye Witness, and after the beginning of World War I, his own paper, G.K.’s Weekly.

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Boston Tea Party

Lead: On a cold December night in 1773, a small group of men disguised with printer’s ink and paint vandalized three cargo ships lying at anchor in Boston Harbor. The so-called Boston Tea Party was a milestone on the road to Revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was all about business and taxes. Monopolies and taxes. Representation and taxes. People hated and were resigned to them at the same time. In the years leading up to the American Revolution, Britons paid a lot of taxes, Americans very little. England, distracted by a century and a half of civil war, religious dispute, and continental military adventures, largely had left the colonies to fend for themselves. The distance was too great and communications too slow for effective colonial administration. During this period the white colonists of British North America had grown increasingly accustomed to self-rule. On average, aside from the Dutch, they were the richest people in the world. They had evolved a system of representative government which varied from colony to colony, paying homage to the British monarch, but for the most part they conducted the affairs of the colonies as if that ruler did not exist.

Charles Dickens in America II

Lead: On his first tour of America in 1842, British author Charles Dickens created a firestorm of abuse by criticizing American publishers for pirating his books.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Americans loved Charles Dickens books, but they didn’t like to pay for them. It was Dickens’ custom to serialize his novels in London newspapers before they were issued in book form. American publishers would obtain the papers, copy the text, and release what amounted to be little more than pirated editions, much to the delight of U.S. citizens who got Dickens on the cheap. The culprit was the lack of any international copyright agreement to which the United States subscribed. When he bitterly complained on his first trip to America, the public accused him of feathering his own nest. The press was especially harsh. It stood to lose much if required to pay for reprints.

 

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Henry’s Wives: Katherine Howard

Lead: Of the wives of Henry VIII, the teenaged Katherine Howard was the least prepared for the task. She paid for it with her head.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Most probably Katherine Howard did not come to Henry's bed as a virgin. The king was then nearly fifty, freshly divorced from the disappointing Anne of Cleaves, extremely fat, with ulcerated legs, in short no great catch. But he was the King of England and when in the spring of 1640 he noticed Katherine, one of Anne's former ladies-in-waiting, he was enchanted. She was everything the German Queen was not and he fell head over heels in love. His first two wives had been set aside because they did not give him a male heir. When that was accomplished by Jane Seymour just before her death, Henry's dynastic needs were not as severe He could return to diplomatic concerns in the search for a Queen. He needed an ally in Lutheran Germany as a counterweight to Catholic Spain and France and chose Anne, sister of the Duke of the German Duchy of Cleaves. They never quite got along and six months later Henry was ready to move on and ripe for the romantic and exciting young Katherine Howard.

 

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Henry’s Wives: Jane Seymour

Lead: The third wife of Henry VIII delivered him the great desire of his life - a son.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Though fascinated at first with the vivacious and exciting Anne Bolyn, Henry began to tire of her soon after their marriage. With her inability to produce a male heir to continue the King's line her position was even more perilous. Late in 1535 the royal eye in its continual wandering lighted on a member of the Queen's entourage, Jane Seymor. At twenty-six, she was the eldest female among ten children of Sir John Seymor a wealthy land owner whose home Wolf Hall was in Wiltshire in southwestern England. They were a court family and Jane had been around for some years before she attracted the king's attention.

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Madame Tussaud

Lead: Despite the advent of television and the internet, the biggest tourist attraction in Britain remains a bizarre collection of wax figures imported to England two centuries ago for a temporary stay.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Marie Tussaud (nee Grosholz) did her apprenticeship with Philippe Curtius in the heady revolutionary days of Paris, 1789. Crowds of the curious flocked to their salons to see exhibits featuring among other oddities, King Louis XVI and his Queen Marie-Antoinette eating their inedible dinner in frozen solitude. The most avid interest then and now continues to be the Chamber of Horrors, the waxed collection of notorious murderers caught in the act of taking their victims.