The Doolittle Raid II

Lead: Convinced America needed a boost to its flagging morale and hoping to inflict at least a little damage on the enemy, President Roosevelt encouraged his service chiefs to strike the Japanese Home Islands. They sent Jimmy Doolittle to Tokyo.

Intro. A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Up to the middle of 1942, the Second World War in the Pacific was largely a one-sided affair. Nearly everywhere American forces were on the defensive, reeling from repeated defeats. Lt. Colonel Doolittle, a legendary test pilot and air ace, assembled a volunteer force and they began to practice to fly B-25 Mitchell Medium Bombers off the deck of the USS Hornet. The plan was to rendezvous with Admiral William Halsey's carrier taskforce in mid-Pacific and close to within 500 miles of Japan where they would launch the two engined bombers heavily loaded with fuel for the 2000 mile trip.

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Christian Children’s Fund

Lead: From 1937 to 1940 as many as 2,000,000 Chinese children died of starvation in the wake of the Japanese invasion. Calvitt Clarke set out to do something about it.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: The twentieth century has borne witness to much progress in technology and at least in some fortunate parts of the world an advance in the standard of living, health and nutrition. But this era has also seen an unprecedented growth in suffering and bloodshed. The specter of total war has at times engulfed the entire world. No longer was the civilian population spared when armies were on the move. Predator governments turned first on their own people then on neighboring nations in what at times seemed to be an endless round of ethnic and ideological conflict.

 

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History’s Turning Points: Japan Rediscovers the Gun II

 

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. Consider history’s turning points: Japan rediscovers the gun.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In 1543 visiting Portuguese explorers jumped from the deck of a Chinese commercial ship into Japanese shallow waters and with their muskets shot a duck. The unfavorable results on the duck were duly noted by Lord Tokitaka who purchased from the Portuguese two guns and commissioned his swordsmiths to copy these new weapons. Within a century firearms were playing a widespread, destructive role in the dynastic and feudal warfare consuming the Japanese upper class. These weapons were very good, indeed the Japanese significantly improved on comparable European designs. One such innovation was waterproof rain protection for the ignition platform, but soon the Japanese abandoned firearms and mostly returned to hand-held weapons such as the sword and the bow and arrow.

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History’s Turing Points: Japan Discovers the Gun I

 

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. Consider history’s turning points: Japan rediscovers the gun.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Japan has taken a well-earned place in the modern era as a seat of much industrial innovation. Within 60 years of the visit of Commodore Perry in 1855, Japan had wrenched itself so significantly into the contemporary world that its navy had inflicted havoc on Russian naval forces at the Battle of Tsushima in the Russo-Japanese War, sending the pride of the Czar’s fleet to the bottom of the Sea of Japan. In another thirty-six years, Japan would temporarily humble the world’s preeminent industrial power at Pearl Harbor.

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The Last Full Measure – Bataan Death March

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Bataan Peninsula juts out into the waters guarding the sea approach to the Philippine capital of Manila. On the west is Subic Bay. Running along its east flank is Manila Bay. Just off Bataan’s southern tip is the oddly shaped island of Corregidor. On Bataan approximately 75,000 U.S and Philippine troops, largely abandoned by the Allied command, held out against hopeless odds against the invading Japanese until the spring of 1942. Soon after their surrender, allied troops were marched off the peninsula in one of the most horrific wartime atrocities in the Asian theater, the Bataan Death March. Nearly 18,000 died.

Cultural Revolution of China II

Lead: The shock troops of the 1960s upheaval, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, were the Red Guards. They became an irresistible force of terror inflicting brutal treatment on thousands of Chinese citizens and destroying priceless parts of China's cultural heritage.   

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1966, Chinese Communist Chairman Mao Zedong launched the Cultural Revolution. Ostensibly, it was a movement designed to shore up the communist movement in China but in reality it was an ill disguised means for Mao, then in his twilight years, to protect his own power and firmly establish his legacy. To accomplish this, the chairman caused the creation of an army of young idealists, the Red Guards, and sent them out to attack any who would deviate from his own principles.

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Cultural Revolution of China I

Lead:  In 1966, Chinese leader Mao Zedong launched the Cultural Revolution. It was an attempt to shore up his power and secure his legacy long into the future. It ended up nearly destroying China. 

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Mao had been the leader and the heart of Chinese Communism since the 1920s. Though not the founder of the party, he had nursed the movement in its infancy, preserved it during the dark years when in order to survive, the Red Army in various groups had to flee by the Long March into interior China during the Civil War. He had led the Communists in common cause with Chiang Kai-shek and the Kuomintang against the Japanese in the 1930s and 1940s and in 1949 had triumphed over Chiang, banishing the latter to Taiwan and establishing undisputed Communist control of the mainland.

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The Last Full Measure – Jose Nisperos

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: In September 1911 Philippine Scout Private Jose B. Nisperos, in extremely violent action against Moros insurgents, became the first Asian to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor. That he should be fighting at all at the side of American soldiers in the Philippines emerged from the debate at the highest levels of the US government over whether the United States should become an imperial power. At the conclusion of the Spanish-American war, America received Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines from Spain. Eventually the imperialist argument won because as an emerging power the US saw economic opportunity in East Asia and wished to have a base there.