Howard Carter and the Tomb of Tutankhamen III

Lead: Howard Carter believed it was there and would not give up.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The rule of Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamen was a short one. He lived about 1350 years before Christ and died at seventeen, his rule brief, obscure and dominated by powerful advisors. He was buried and over the years the location was forgotten. Ironically, this anonymity probably saved his tomb from plundering by graverobbers. Wealthy Egyptians would fill their graves with rich articles supposedly for use in the afterlife. Thieves and even some of the priests who buried them would take note of the tomb's location, wait a day or so, break in and clean it out.

 

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Howard Carter and the Tomb of Tutankhamen II

Lead: In 1922 the discovery of the hidden tomb of a teenager electrified the world.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Ancient Egyptians marked their history by the dynasties of their Pharaohs. Modern historians for simplicity have divided this saga into Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms interspersed with occasional periods of political and social chaos. The great pyramids at Giza were built in the Old Kingdom, political consolidation came during the Middle and Egypt reached out to establish an Empire in the New Kingdom south into Africa and north to Palestine and Syria. During this last period, perhaps because of the exposure to other cultures afforded by military expansion, one of the Pharaohs, Akhenaton who ruled Egypt about 1350 years before Christ developed a new religion. He and his wife Nefertiti rejected the multiple Egyptian gods and enshrined a new belief based on a single deity, the sun-god, Aton. To make a clear break with the past Akhenaton moved the government to a newly constructed capital north along the Nile from the ancient city of Thebes and called it El-Amarna.

 

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Howard Carter and the Tomb of Tutankhamen I

Lead: Howard Carter put his head through the small opening. What he saw changed his life.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Howard Carter was born in Norfolk, England in the high Victorian era of British Colonial Confidence. The British Navy still ruled the oceans of the world, and despite occasional setbacks such as the Sepoy Mutiny in India and the Boer War, until the dawn of the twentieth century the British Empire stretched proud and virtually unchallenged to the far corners of the globe.

 

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Vincent Willem Van Gogh Part II

Lead: In 1885, five years before his death, Vincent Van Gogh created his first masterpiece, “The Potato Eaters.” It reflected his desire to connect with ordinary people and portray their lives with elemental integrity.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Van Gogh’s reputation as perhaps the greatest post-impressionist artist is based on the works he created during the last three years of his life. He did not intend to take up art until 1880 when, at the age of 27, he embarked on a five years quest to acquire the technical skills that emerged in his great paintings. Even as late as 1885, his sketches and drawings lacked the superb technique that would make him famous.

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Movies in 3-D

Lead: Gimmick or the real thing? Fad or the salvation of the movie industry? After World War II, facing the threat of television and the dissolution of the studio system, film makers thought they had a way out of their troubles: 3-D

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: One of the wonders of the human body is stereoscopic vision. The placement of a pair of eyes, slightly separated on the face and therefore viewing a slightly different perspective gives humans the ability to discern depth and distance.

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Leonardo da Vinci – III

Lead: During the Italian Renaissance, artists and other people of ability, found themselves in a seller’s market, able to sell their services to patrons willing to pay large stipends for talent. Leonardo da Vinci proved himself adept at make that system work.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Until the Renaissance the talent of European scholars, musicians, artists, sculptors, and architects was largely held captive by the church and to a lesser degree national states such as France and England. In the 14th century there was a revival of interest in ancient Greek and Roman culture with their emphasis on individualism and meritorious achievement. Wealth generated in the rich Italian city-states, created much discretionary income. Renaissance artists were able to exploit this environment and bargain their services to the highest bidder. Commanding high commissions for their talent, artists such as Leonardo da Vinci could move from city to city, choosing their work, and exploring their interests in a way theretofore almost impossible.

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Leonardo da Vinci II

Lead: After years of apprenticeship in Florence, Italy renaissance artist, engineer, sculptor, and man of mystery, Leonardo da Vinci, left for Milan where he began his career as a painter in the court of Duke Ludovico Sforza.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The undisputed artistic output of Leonardo da Vinci was remarkably small. For a painter with such a prodigious reputation, from a lifetime of work, only seventeen paintings attributed to this master have survived and several of those were unfinished, some coming down to the modern era only as copies. His paintings were generally of Biblical or historical themes, though his most renown, Mona Lisa, was neither.

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Leonardo da Vinci – I

Lead: Judged by some scholars as perhaps the most brilliant and accomplished man in history, Leonard da Vinci combined artistic genius, acute intelligence, and innate curiosity in a life of deep mystery. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Born in 1452 in the Tuscan village of Vinci, Leonardo was the illegitimate son of a Florentine notary and landlord and a peasant girl. He was raised in his father’s home and there received the basic education expected in the home of a wealthy and prominent family.

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